Module Co-ordinators:

Professor Parveen Kumar, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Professor David Rampton, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr Debra Marcos, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr Alicia Green, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

In this module you will study:

  • Upper GI Diseases
  • Mechanisms of GI cancer, Environmental and genetic bases. Molecular and cellular development of cancer. Principles of screening and identifying GI cancer. Medical and surgical treatment of GI cancers
  • Upper GI disorders and its treatment. Oesophageal Gastric Cancer
  • Causes, clinical presentation and treatment of different GI bleeding situations
  • Aetiopathogenesis of Barrett’s oesophagus  and role of Endoscopy for diagnosis and follow-up. Treatment and management of reflux
  • Different methods of Diagnosis the Upper GI tract (special consideration of Endoscopy)
  • Small Bowel and malabsorption.
  • Genetics and Molecular basis of Colorectal Cancer
  • Principles and practicalities of screening of Colon cancer
  • Approach to treatment of Colorectal Cancer
  • Approach to patients with colonic diseases and most common clinical presentations
  • Understanding of current and developing treatments for different colonic diseases
  • Recognition of most common surgical colonic emergencies and management
  • Diagnosis and management of different polyposis syndromes
  • Undertake self-directed learning and prepare specific aspects of colonic diseases
  • Exposition to research methods and recent developments using scientific papers

MODULE ASSESSMENT

One examination lasting 1.5 or 2 hours. This module exam is worth 60% of the mark for the module, with the remaining 40% constituted by coursework, which will be set at the start of the module. The coursework assignment [essay] will have a maximum of 2000 words, or an oral presentation or a poster presentation to the examiner.

Module convener:         

Michele Branscombe, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Other Key Staff:           

Consultant Staff from Barts and the London and PHE

This module extends the knowledge acquired in all the other modules of this degree to create an in depth knowledge of infectious disease.
Students also are equipped with knowledge essential to the efficient management of a diagnostic laboratory.

The module aims to provide:

  • A deeper understanding of infectious diseases in humans.
  • A knowledge of quality control diagnostic laboratory management.
  • A knowledge of methods of evaluation of new methods for use in the diagnostic laboratory
  • A knowledge of the role of new technologies e.g. molecular and automation in the diagnostic laboratory.
  • An understanding of legislation relevant to diagnostic laboratories
  • An understanding of the role of the diagnostic laboratory within the NHS and with external agencies such as the PHE and WHO.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a deeper understanding of infectious diseases in humans.
  • Explain the concepts of quality control in the diagnostic laboratory and be able to develop suitable quality control methods.
  • Evaluate new methods for use in the diagnostic laboratory and write SOPs
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the role of new technologies e.g. molecular and automation in the diagnostic laboratory.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of legislation relevant to diagnostic laboratories
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the diagnostic laboratory within the NHS and with external agencies such as the PHE and WHO and be able to complete notification forms for these agencies.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts and journals include:
any recommended in other modules for this course.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Midyear examination

This is a mid- module exam paper .The paper will consist of 3 questions of equal value. The student will answer 1 question. The questions will be in the style of an extended essay
Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 60 minutes
Percentage weighting in module: 15%
Pass mark: 50%
Qualifying mark. 40%

Development of a COSSH assessment and SMI for a new test

This is a written exercise. You will be given details of a new test which is to be introduced to the laboratory and departmental COSSH and SOP templates. You will be required to research the elements of the test and complete the COSSH and SOP forms.
You are given the information at least 4 weeks before the submission date.
Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: Completion of templates
Percentage weighting in module: 10%

End of Module Paper

This is a final exam paper taken during the formal exam period in June or July The paper will consist of at least 6 questions of equal value. The student will answer 4 questions. The questions will be in the style of extended essays requiring the ability to discuss and evaluate as well as factual content.
Type of assessment: Formal examination
Duration: 3 hours
Percentage weighting in module: 75%

Viva

This is an oral examination taken at the end of all your taught modules. You will be examined by a pair of examiners, one will be an internal examiner (usually a module convener or a member of staff who has involvement of the course e.g. a clinician from the Barts and the London NHS Trust) and an external examiner. Most pairs of examiners are arranged so that one is a clinician and one is a scientist. You will be examined about your knowledge across the entire clinical microbiology curriculum.
This assessment does not carry any marks but is used by the examiners to assess the depth of your knowledge and may be used at exam board level if you are a borderline candidate.

 

 

Module convener:         

Michele Branscombe, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

This module is an introduction to the major groups of anti-microbials their use and how resistance can develop. From practical experience students will evaluate in vitro anti-microbial test results to inform the use of appropriate therapy in the clinical setting. Emphasis is also placed on the consideration of the appropriate use of anti-microbial guidelines and the use anti-microbials in clinical situations to prevent the development of antimicrobial resistance.

The module aims to provide:

  • An introduction to the structure, function and method of action and mode of resistance for the commonly prescribed antimicrobial agents including anti viral, anti parasitic and anti fungal agents.
  • Demonstrate the role of the laboratory in the optimisation of antibiotic therapy.
  • A clinical based approach to the use of antimicrobials in practice.
  • An understanding of the development and use of antimicrobial guidelines and how these can limit the development of resistance and to encourage cost benefit analysis of antimicrobial choice.
  • An introduction to the role of the pharmacist in antimicrobial therapy
  • An introduction to emerging antimicrobials.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the structure, function and method of action and mode of resistance for the commonly prescribed antimicrobial agents including anti viral and anti fungal agents.
  • Perform laboratory based tests and interpret them to optimise antibiotic therapy.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the use of antimicrobials in clinical practice .
  • Develop and use antimicrobial guidelines to limit the development of resistance and to encourage cost benefit analysis of antimicrobial choice.
  • Become a professional member of a multidisciplinary team controlling the use of antimicrobials within a clinical setting. Be aware of the roles of others, e.g. pharmacists and specialists in haematology or surgery
  • Explain the development process for a new antimicrobial from discovery through development, clinical trials and into clinical use. Be aware of the most recently developed antimicrobials which have reached the formulary and those which are in final phase three clinical trials.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:

Finch et al: Antibiotic and Chemotherapy.
Walsh: Antibiotics: Actions, Origins and Resistance
British National Formulary

Suggested journals include:
International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Formative Assessment

To assist you with your learning and understanding a formative MCQ (Multiple Choice Questions) assessment is set.

End of module written assessment

This is an end of module exam paper. The paper will consist of 4 questions of equal value. The student will answer 2 questions. The questions will be in the style of short notes or essays.
Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 60 minutes
Percentage weighting in module: 100%

Module convener:         

Michele Branscombe, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

This module is an introduction to the major groups of anti-microbials their use and how resistance can develop. From practical experience students will evaluate in vitro anti-microbial test results to inform the use of appropriate therapy in the clinical setting. Emphasis is also placed on the consideration of the appropriate use of anti-microbial guidelines and the use anti-microbials in clinical situations to prevent the development of antimicrobial resistance.

The module aims to provide:

  • An introduction to the structure, function and method of action and mode of resistance for the commonly prescribed antimicrobial agents including anti viral, anti parasitic and anti fungal agents.
  • Demonstrate the role of the laboratory in the optimisation of antibiotic therapy.
  • A clinical based approach to the use of antimicrobials in practice.
  • An understanding of the development and use of antimicrobial guidelines and how these can limit the development of resistance and to encourage cost benefit analysis of antimicrobial choice.
  • An introduction to the role of the pharmacist in antimicrobial therapy
  • An introduction to emerging antimicrobials.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the structure, function and method of action and mode of resistance for the commonly prescribed antimicrobial agents including anti viral and anti fungal agents.
  • Perform laboratory based tests and interpret them to optimise antibiotic therapy.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the use of antimicrobials in clinical practice .
  • Develop and use antimicrobial guidelines to limit the development of resistance and to encourage cost benefit analysis of antimicrobial choice.
  • Become a professional member of a multidisciplinary team controlling the use of antimicrobials within a clinical setting. Be aware of the roles of others, e.g. pharmacists and specialists in haematology or surgery
  • Explain the development process for a new antimicrobial from discovery through development, clinical trials and into clinical use. Be aware of the most recently developed antimicrobials which have reached the formulary and those which are in final phase three clinical trials.

MAIN MODULE READINGS

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:

Finch et al: Antibiotic and Chemotherapy.
Walsh: Antibiotics: Actions, Origins and Resistance
British National Formulary

Suggested journals include:
International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Formative Assessment

To assist you with your learning and understanding a formative MCQ (Multiple choice questions) assessment is set.

End of module written assessment

Duration: 60 minutes
Percentage weighting in module: 100%

 

Module Lead:

Mr Mark Wilson

This module will cover the pathophysiology of brain and spinal Cord injury.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • To critically evaluate the principles of diagnosis and treatment for patients with traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries.
  • Describe the mechanisms and dysfunction inherent to traumatic brain injury and
  • Outline the key elements of their management.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Summative assessments occur weekly, and for each module will comprise of:

  • Multiple choice questions (MCQ) – Percentage weighting 20%
  • Written assignment of 1500 words (+-10%) – Percentage weighting 80% - minimum pass mark of 50%

Module Leads:

Prof. Karim BrohiThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Prof. Susan Brundage, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

This elective module will deepen and broaden the knowledge on patients with burns injuries. To develop a more critical and evaluative approach to the care of burns patients, through a complete overview of assessment, stabilization and management in respect to the most recent literature.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Evaluate the deranged physiology due to severe burns.
  • Estimate entity of burn injuries and identify associate injuries.
  • Develop knowledge of methods for initial management and fluid resuscitation for patients with burn injuries.
  • Improve management skills required in the care of burn patients.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Summative assessments occur weekly, and for each module will comprise of:

  • Multiple choice questions (MCQ) – Percentage weighting 20%
  • Written assignment of 1500 words (+-10%) – Percentage weighting 80% - minimum pass mark of 50%

Dept. responsible. Barts Cancer Institute

Course organiser: Dr S-A Martin, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

As a major world disease with high mortality and morbidity along with its large impact on health services, cancer has become a topic that medical students want to learn about. The module will examine the scope of cancer, its causes, how to diagnose it, how to treat it and how it should be assessed, both experimentally and clinically.

Key themes:  The module will start with the definition of neoplasia and will go on to describe the macro- and microscopic appearance of a range of specific tumours and current ideas on the molecular and genetic basis of their pathogenesis. The transformation from normal to malignant tissue will be described together with the manner in which tumours grow and spread. The course will end with an overview of tumour diagnosis and general methods of treatment (pharmacological, radiotherapeutic and surgical).

This is a taught module delivered by lectures. The module starts with the definition of neoplasia and will describe the macro and micro appearance of a range of specific tumours and current ideas on the molecular and genetic basis of their pathogenesis. The transformation from normal to malignant tissue will be covered together with the manner in which tumours grow and spread. The course will end with an overview of tumour diagnosis and treatment, the latter including pharmacological, surgical and radiotherapeutic regimens.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completion of this course, you should have a clear idea of the distinction between benign and malignant neoplasia and the factors, which cause a tissue to loose its ability to control its growth and proliferation. You will be able to recognise the histological features of various tumours and have an overview of current techniques for their diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. However, as a basic science course, the focus will be on the underlying molecular biological mechanisms of tissue transformation and tumour growth, rather than clinical aspects of cancer.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Cancer Biology assessment 80% exam, 20% coursework

Dept. responsible: Pathology Unit, Blizard Institute

Course organiser:

Prof Steve E. Greenwald, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world and is fast becoming a comparable problem in the developing countries. The module describes some of the mechanical factors that underlie the pathogenesis and progression of vascular disease. This requires a brief outline of fluid dynamical and elasticity theory sufficient to understand the properties of extensible and non-linearly elastic materials such as arteries, and the behaviour of blood flowing in them. This approach is not commonly followed in the preclinical medical course, but it provides an essential adjunct to the biochemical and metabolic description of cardiovascular disease that students will encounter in their clinical studies.

Topics include: Basic theory of elasticity, non-linear and viscoelastic description of arteries. Introduction to haemodynamics, pulsatile flow in distensible tubes, wave reflection. Arterial structure and composition. Models of vascular elasticity and the relationship between arterial structure and function. The effect of age and vascular disease on this relationship. Response of the arterial system to chronic changes in pressure and flow. Endogenous control of vascular tone and the control of blood pressure. The role of the vascular endothelial cell and its response to changes in blood flow. Mechanical factors in hypertension. Non-invasive measurement of vascular elasticity and endothelial function. Novel treatments for vascular disease.

This is a taught module delivered by lectures. This module covers normal development of the cardiovascular system in terms of the changing demands due to growth and ageing. This approach is extended to elucidate the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in terms of the response of cells in the vascular wall to changes in mechanical load such as increased blood pressure or reduced flow. This module integrates the model of vascular pathology with epidemiological factors such as fetal malnutrition, which affect vessel development in early life and which are linked to an increased incidence of vascular disease in middle age. Also covered is the diagnosis and treatment of these problems, allowing students to gain an understanding of non-invasive measurement techniques to monitor the development of abnormal blood vessel properties.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

To understand the normal development of the cardiovascular system in terms of the changing demands on the system during growth and ageing. This approach is extended to elucidate the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in terms of the response of cells in the vascular wall to changes in mechanical load such as increased blood pressure or reduced flow. To integrate this model of vascular pathology with epidemiological factors such as foetal malnutrition, which affect vessel development in early life and which are linked to an increased incidence of vascular disease in middle age. Finally, as a means of diagnosing and treating these problems, to gain an understanding of non-invasive measurement techniques to monitor the development of abnormal blood vessel properties.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Examination 80%

Coursework 20%

Module convener:                       

Michele Branscombe, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Other Key Staff:                                             

Professor Mike Millar (Control of Hospital Acquired Infection), This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Throughout this module students will study microbial infections of humans. The clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis, antimicrobial therapy and infection control issues of the microbial infections are explored both theoretically and practically. The infections are studied by organ system e.g. respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and also by looking at specialist patient groups e.g. the immuno-compromised, patients in the intensive care unit, pregnancy and paediatrics. Students also study the surveillance, legislation and methods of control of hospital acquired infection.

The module aims to provide:

  • An in depth study of the aetiology, presentation and antimicrobial therapy of infectious disease by organ system e.g. respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract.
  • An in depth study of the aetiology, presentation and antimicrobial therapy of infectious disease in specialist patient groups e.g. the immunocompromised, infections during pregnancy
  • Practical experience of the laboratory investigation of infections including point of care testing.
  • A knowledge of surveillance of hospital acquired infection
  • An understanding of methods of transmission of hospital acquired infection and appropriate measures to control hospital acquired infection.
  • An understanding of the legislation relating to hospital acquired infection.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will have a knowledge and understanding of:

  • the aetiology, pathogenesis and presentation of infectious disease in the community, including older people and care homes
  • the design and application of a range of clinical microbiology laboratory investigations in different healthcare settings used in the detection and management of microbial infections in high risk groups
  • the methods used in the application of microbiology testing to food, water and environmental samples in community and hospital settings.
  • the legal framework and the role of guidelines and the hospital infection team in reducing hospital acquired infections

At the end of this module students will have intellectual skills which will enable them to:

  • Describe the methods used in the investigation and management of infectious disease in the community including treatment of commonly associated micro-organisms.
  • Understand the sources and routes of transmission of hospital acquired infections and the risks caused to patients.
  • Understand the role of the clinical microbiology laboratory and the infection control team in surveillance, decontamination, disinfection and sterilisation in the hospital and primary care settings.
  • Apply relevant health and safety rules and regulations associated with infection control.
  • At the end of this module students will have the following transferable skills and will be able to:
  • Participate in the partnership between the clinical microbiology with other clinical specialisms and agencies in the investigation of infectious disease in the community and hospital setting.

At the end of this module students will have the following practical skills and will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to perform the range of laboratory techniques used in the work-base to investigate infectious disease in the community.
  • demonstrate the ability to perform the range of laboratory techniques used in the work-base to investigate and contain hospital acquired infection

CORE READINGS

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:

Bannister et al: Infection, Microbiology and Management
Mandell et al: Principles and Practices of Infectious Diseases
British National Formulary
Wilson: Infection control in clinical practice
Hawker et al: Communicable disease control handbook

Suggested journals include:

The Lancet Infectious Diseases
Journal of Infection
Current Opinions in Infectious Disease

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Clinical case presentation (oral and written)

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 15 minutes and 1000 words
Percentage weighting in module: 50%

End of module examination

Type of assessment: Examination
Duration: 2 hours
Percentage weighting in module: 50%

 

Module convener          

Michele Branscombe, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Other Key Staff:     

Professor Lucinda Hall, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This module is an introduction to clinical research and covers the theory and practice of clinical research and the presentation of the results of research and clinical cases.

The module aims to provide:

  • An introduction to clinical research ethics.
  • Statistical teaching to enable students of design appropriate data collection and interpret scientific date generated by research data.
  • An introduction of the use of scientific literature and correct referencing techniques.
  • An understanding of how to read a scientific paper.
  • Opportunities to participate in web based clinical and journal discussions.
  • Opportunities to use oral presentations for clinical cases, journal discussion and scientific research.
  • An introduction to scientific poster presentation.
  • A structure to enable students to undertake reflective practice

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Understand clinical research ethics.
  • Design appropriate data collection for statistical uses and interpret scientific date generated by research data.
  • Use electronic library resources to find primary scientific journals and appropriately reference in any written work.
  • Write an abstract for a scientific paper.
  • Participate in web based clinical and journal discussions.
  • Give oral presentations on clinical cases, journal articles and scientific research.
  • Research and present a scientific poster.
  • Exercise reflective practice.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:

Dytham: Choosing and using statistics: A biologists guide.Harris: Medical statistics made easy
Bjorn: How to Write and Illustrate a Scientific Paper
Katz: From research to manuscript: A guide to Scientific Writing
Dytham: Choosing and using statistics: A biologists guide
Harris: Medical statistics made easy
Freeman: How to read a paper: the basis of evidence based medicine

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Abstract writing

Students are given a recent scientific paper with a pathogenesis theme. The abstract has been removed. Students read the paper and write an abstract.
Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 2 hours
Percentage weighting in module:35%

Oral presentation

Students work in groups of two or three to prepare a 10 or 15 minute presentation on a topic linked with an area of study in the Clinical Microbiology: Diagnosis and management of human disease and control of hospital infection module.

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 15 minutes presentation
Percentage weighting in module: 30%

Poster presentation

Students prepare and present a scientific poster on a topic linked with an area of study in the antimicrobial module.

Type of assessment: Coursework
Percentage weighting in module: 30%

Oral Presentation

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 15 minutes
Percentage weighting in module: 5%

Module convener                          

Michele Branscombe, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Other Key Staff:                                              

Professor Mike Millar (Control of Hospital Acquired Infection), This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Throughout this module students will study microbial infections of humans. The clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis, antimicrobial therapy and infection control issues of the microbial infections are explored both theoretically and practically. The infections are studied by organ system e.g. respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and also by looking at specialist patient groups e.g. the immunocompromised, paediatrics.
Students also study the surveillance, legislation and methods of control of hospital acquired infection.

The module aims to provide:

  • An in depth study of the aetiology, presentation and antimicrobial therapy of infectious disease by organ system e.g. respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract.
  • An in depth study of the aetiology, presentation and antimicrobial therapy of infectious disease in specialist patient groups e.g. the immunocompromised, infections during pregnancy
  • Practical experience of the laboratory investigation of infections including point of care testing.
  • A knowledge of surveillance of hospital acquired infection
  • An understanding of methods of transmission of hospital acquired infection and appropriate measures to control hospital acquired infection.
  • An understanding of the legislation relating to hospital acquired infection.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Understand the diversity of infectious agents causing systemic disease and be able to apply their knowledge to assist in the diagnosis and therapy of infectious disease.
  • Demonstrate that they are aware that specialist patient groups may present with unique clinical situations which require special consideration.
  • Demonstrate the practical skills in a clinical laboratory to investigate clinical samples to guide diagnosis and therapy of the patient.
  • Participate in routine surveillance for hospital acquired infection
  • Appreciate methods of transmission of hospital acquired infection and be able to instigate appropriate measures to control hospital acquired infection. Students will be equipped to work within a multidisciplinary infection control team and to relate to other professionals within the team.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the legislation relating to hospital acquired infection.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:

Bannister et al: Infection, Microbiology and Management
Mandell et al: Principles and Practices of Infectious Diseases

British National Formulary

Wilson: Infection control in clinical practice
Hawker et al: Communicable disease control handbook

Suggested journals include:

The Lancet Infectious Diseases
Journal of Infection
Current Opinions in Infectious Disease

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Spot examination

This is a written examination answering short questions about the laboratory diagnosis of infection and longer questions about interpretation of laboratory results.
Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 2 hours
Percentage weighting in module:15%

Midmodule examination

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 60 minutes
Percentage weighting in module: 15%

End of Module Examination

Type of assessment: Formal examination
Duration: 2 hours
Percentage weighting in module: 70%

Module Convenor:

Michele Branscombe, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.             

Other Key Staff:              

Dr Mathias Dittmar, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mr James Winch

This module introduces the clinically important bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi.
The lectures focus on recent developments in classification, pathogenicity and identification of these organisms.
The lectures are studied in conjunction with the practical sessions of the core diagnostic microbiology and laboratory methods module to develop a complete understanding of the organism, mechanisms of pathogenicity and laboratory diagnosis of clinically important micro-organisms.

This module offers the student:

  • A thorough knowledge and understanding of the major bacteria which can cause disease in humans. This knowledge is to include an understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis and identification.
  • A thorough knowledge and understanding of the major fungi which can cause disease in humans. This knowledge is to include an understanding of life cycles, mechanisms of pathogenesis and identification.
  • A thorough knowledge and understanding of the major parasites which can cause disease in humans. This knowledge is to include an understanding of life cycles, mechanisms of pathogenesis and identification.
  • A thorough knowledge and understanding of the major viruses which can cause disease in humans. This knowledge is to include an understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis and identification.
  • A knowledge of microbial agents of tropical disease.
  • A knowledge of new and emerging pathogens.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge and understanding of the major bacteria which can cause disease in humans. This knowledge is to include an understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis and identification.
  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge and understanding of the major fungi which can cause disease in humans. This knowledge is to include an understanding of life cycles, mechanisms of pathogenesis and identification.
  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge and understanding of the major parasites which can cause disease in humans. This knowledge is to include an understanding of life cycles, mechanisms of pathogenesis and identification.
  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge and understanding of the major viruses which can cause disease in humans. This knowledge is to include an understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis and identification.
  • Demonstrate an understanding global distribution of organisms and the significance of this distribution in disease in the population in the UK, in travellers and in the global population.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:
Murray et al: Manual of clinical microbiology
or
de la Maza et al: Colour Atlas of clinical microbiology.
or
Bailey and Scotts Diagnostic microbiology

Campbell et al: Identification of pathogenic fungi
or
Larone: Medically important fungi: a guide to identification

Garcia: Practical guide to diagnostic parasitology
or
Zeibig: Clinical parasitology: A practical approach

Kudesia and Wreghitt: Clinical diagnostic virology.
or
Specter et al: Clinical virology manual

Suggested journals include:
Journal of clinical virology
Virology
Trends in parasitology

Suggested websites include:
http://www.mycology.adelaide.edu.au/

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Mycology essay

This is a 3000-3500 word essay.
Type of assessment: Coursework
Percentage weighting in module: 25%

End of Module Paper

Type of assessment: Formal examination
Duration: 90 minutes
Percentage weighting in module: 75%

Module Leads:

Prof. Karim BrohiThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Prof. Susan Brundage, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

This module will provide a solid background in the rapidly evolving area of critical care. Focusing on the physiological aspects of critically ill patients

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • To develop a critical approach to the trauma patients in the setting of an intensive care unit. Where special attention will be given to "hot topics" such as shock therapy, ventilator management, infectious disease.
  • Learn advanced theoretical ground to help with the decision making process on critical care.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Summative assessments occur weekly, and for each module will comprise of:

  • Multiple choice questions (MCQ) – Percentage weighting 20%
  • Written assignment of 1500 words (+-10%) – Percentage weighting 80% - minimum pass mark of 50%

Module convener:

Michele Branscombe, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Other Key Staff:              

Mr James Winch                              

This module introduces the practical laboratory techniques to identify clinically important bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi. The practicals focus on traditional and modern molecular techniques for the identification of these organisms.  

The hands on practicals are studied in conjunction with the lectures of the Clinical microbiology: Pathogens and commensals module to develop a complete understanding of the organism, mechanisms of pathogenicity and laboratory diagnosis of clinically important micro-organisms.

This module offers the student

  • A working knowledge of the current health and safety issues relating to clinical laboratories in general with special reference to working in a containment level 2 laboratory with human samples and pathogens.
  • An understanding of the current health and safety issues relating to containment level 3 and 4 laboratories.
  • Experience identifying the major human pathogens and commensal bacteria.
  • Experience identifying the major human pathogens and commensal fungi.
  • Experience identifying the major human parasites and vectors.
  • Experience the serological techniques for identifying viral infections.
  • An understanding of modern identification techniques including molecular identification and automated identification of organisms.
  • An understanding of how to evaluate new techniques and tests for use in research and in the diagnostic laboratory.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Work safely in a containment level 2 laboratory with human samples and pathogens.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the current health and safety issues relating to containment level 3 and 4 laboratories.
  • Identifying the major human pathogens and commensal bacteria using microscopy, biochemical and molecular tests.
  • Identify the major human pathogens and commensal fungi using microscopy, biochemical and molecular tests.
  • Identify the major human parasites and vectors using microscopy, biochemical and molecular tests.
  • Apply serological techniques for identifying viral infections.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of modern identification techniques including molecular identification and automated identification of organisms.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how to evaluate new techniques and tests for use in research and in the diagnostic laboratory.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:

Murray et al: Manual of clinical microbiology or de la Maza et al: Colour Atlas of clinical microbiology. Or District laboratory practice in tropical countries parts 1 and 2 or
similar.

Campbell et al: Identification of pathogenic fungi or Larone: Medically important fungi: a guide to identification or similar

Garcia: Practical guide to diagnostic parasitology or Zeibig: Clinical parasitology: A practical approach or similar

Kudesia and Wreghitt: Clinical diagnostic virology.or Specter et al: Clinical virology manual
or similar.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Basic laboratory skills

This assessment is designed to assess basic laboratory skills.
Type of assessment: Practical exam
Duration: 90 minutes
Percentage weighting in module: 10%
Pass mark: 50%
Qualifying mark: 40%

Bacteriology Practical examination

This assessment is designed to assess the skills and ability to apply them developed during the module.
Type of assessment: Practical examination and spots.
Duration: 3 hours
Percentage weighting in module: 20%

Practical examination

This assessment is designed to assess the skills and ability to apply them developed during the module.
Type of assessment: Practical examination and spots during formal examination period.
Duration: 3 hours
Percentage weighting in module: 70%

Module convener:         

Dr Albert Mifsud, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.              

This is a compulsory core module covering aspects of public health and communicable disease control.
After an introduction to practical epidemiology with special reference to clinical microbiology and infectious disease in the community, the module focuses on the relationship between the NHS, HPA, environmental health services and other relevant bodies in the UK.  The module also explores the worldwide public health issues which have implications for public health in the UK. The microbiology and legal aspects of food and water borne infections are also included within this module.

The module aims to provide:

  • An introduction to epidemiology including study design
  • An overview of the role of the clinical microbiology laboratory and the clinical microbiologist in the control of communicable disease within the UK including an understanding of the other agencies in the UK (e.g. NHS, HPA, environmental health services and councils) and the interaction required between clinical microbiology and these agencies for continued good public health.
  • An introduction to the principles of outbreak investigation and control including look back.
  • An understanding of the role of the microbiology laboratory in the quality assurance of food and water in the UK and the current legislation and guidelines on microbiological testing of food and water.
  • An awareness of worldwide infectious disease and implications for public health and communicable disease control in the UK in relation to visitors to the UK and UK residents travelling overseas
  • An overview of the role of vaccination in communicable disease control within the UK.
  • An understanding of the threat of bioterrorism in the UK, possible agents and the role of the clinical microbiology in control of such an event.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Design an epidemiological survey including a patient questionnaire.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the roles of the other agencies in the UK (e.g. NHS, HPA, environmental health services and councils) in communicable disease control. Students should be able to identify their role within communicable disease control and be able to interact professionally with other agencies.
  • Recognise an outbreak situation, establish relevant investigations and control procedures. Students will be able to communicate effectively with journalists to enable accurate and relevant information about an outbreak and control procedures to be relayed to the public. Students will be able to complete a look back exercise.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the microbiology laboratory in the quality assurance of food and water in the UK and the current legislation and guidelines on microbiological testing of food and water.
  • Locate up to date, relevant information about infectious diseases overseas from appropriate sources including HPA, CCDC and WHO. Explain the use of vaccination and prophylaxis for travellers from the UK. Demonstrate an understanding of specialist public health issues of immigrants to the UK.
  • Explain the current UK routine vaccination schedule and to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of current vaccinations.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the threat of bioterrorism in the UK, possible agents and the role of the clinical microbiology in control of such an event.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:
Webber: Communicable Disease, epidemiology and Control
or
Hawker et al: Communicable Disease Control Handbook

Roberts and Greenwood: Practical Food Microbiology

Suggested journals include:
Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Public Health Information

To develop your skills communicating with patients and the general public you will be asked to produce either a press release or a patient information leaflet about a selected topic in public health. This is a formative Multiple Choice Question assessment.

End of module written assessment

This is an end of module exam paper taken at the end of the module.
Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 2 hours
Percentage weighting in module: 100%

          

Module lead: Sally Kerry
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This is a core module for the MSc global public health and policy, MSc, global health, law and governance, and MSc health systems and global policy.

This module introduces students to key epidemiological and statistical concepts and methods used in public health and policy making. Students will be expected to understand, define, and use incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates; understand the principles of standardisation and survival analysis; understand how to differentiate between association and causation and hypothesis generation and testing; and understand the principles of screening criteria. The module will also equip students to critically appraise quantitative research evidence underpinning policy interventions designed to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease and ameliorate inequalities in health through an understanding of research study designs and statistical techniques, including tests of significance and confidence intervals.

The module will include case studies to explore contemporary policy debates and the influence of quantitative research studies on public health and primary care policy and government intervention programmes. The advantages and disadvantages of different study designs and their application to different research questions will be covered. Students will gain skills in summarising quantitative data, including routine morbidity and mortality measures and interpreting the results of commonly used statistical techniques.

The module is intended to equip students for primary care and public health research, policy, and practice, and to enable them to engage in clinical policy debates around interventions designed to reduce social inequalities. They will be able to critically appraise the quality of research and clinical trials and will have the building blocks on which to build evidence based practice.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

Identify appropriate data sources and apply a range of methods commonly used for summarising different types of quantitative data.
• Articulate the advantages and disadvantages of different study designs commonly encountered in public health and primary research.
• For a range of commonly encountered public health and primary care problems, identify the appropriate type of analysis depending on data type, study design, and research questions.
• Critically appraise research papers and interpret results in the light of this appraisal.
• Interpret data from a set of tables and write a report.
• Critically assess statistics and epidemiological data and data sources reported in the media and used by parliament.
• Use quantitative data confidently and competently.
• Use information from research studies for evidence based decision making.

CORE READING

Core text books
Statistics and study design
• Katz MH. Study Design and Statistical Analysis: A Practical Guide for Clinicians. (2006) Cambridge 2006
Epidemiology
• Coggon D, Barker D, Rose G. Epidemiology for the uninitiated. 5th edition Wiley-Blackwell 2003. 4th edition available from www.bmj.com
Critical appraisal
• Greenhalgh, T. How to read a paper. The basics of evidence based medicine. (2010) 4th edition Wiley Blackwell. Available from www.bmj.com
For more information on the textbooks see “Module Information” on QMplus
Key papers
• McPherson K. Breast Cancer screening: balancing the debate BMJ 2010; 340 doi: 10.1136/bmj.c3106.
• Setel et al. Scandal of invisibility: making everyone count by being counted. The Lancet 2007;370(9598):1569-1577.
Additional textbooks
Statistics and study design
• Kirkwood BR & Sterne JAC (2003) Essential medical statistics. Blackwell (Oxford)

MODULE ASSESSMENT

(i) presentation in week 7 (30%); 2 hour written exam (70%)

Dept. responsible. Pathology Unit, Blizard Institute

Course organisers:

Prof Adrian Newland, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr Paul Allen, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Haematology is one of the cornerstones of pathology and will develop into a key component of our course. The module design aims to instil in-depth knowledge of blood diseases, how these diseases may be resolved and the latest in scientific and clinical developments in the field.

Topics include: Subject matter will include normal haemopoiesis, the achievement of haemostasis and the diseases associated with de-regulated haemostasis. The student will go on to acquire an associated knowledge of haemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders. Key elements of red cell abnormalities including the thalassaemias, sickle cell disease and certain anaemias e.g. Diamond Blackfan, are covered in-depth. The science and clinical aspects of blood transfusion will be covered. The module will encompass inherited bone marrow failures illustrated by lectures on monogenic disorders associated with aplastic anaemia such as Fanconi anaemia and dyskeratosis congenita. Progress in the clinical resolution of these diseases is covered by clinical members of faculty. The latest in genetics, the hereditary aspects of some of these diseases, and the molecular diagnosis of haematological disorders is taught by our scientific community.

This will be a taught module delivered through lectures. Subject matter will include normal haemopoiesis, the achievement of haemostasis and the diseases associated with de-regulated haemostasis. The student will go on to acquire an associated knowledge of haemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders. Key elements of red cell abnormalities including the thalassaemias, sickle cell disease and certain anaemias e.g. Diamond Blackfan, are covered in-depth. The science and clinical aspects of blood transfusion will be covered. The module will encompass inherited bone marrow failures illustrated by lectures on monogenic disorders associated with aplastic anaemia such as Fanconi anaemia and dyskeratosis congenita. Progress in the clinical resolution of these diseases is covered by clinical members of faculty. The latest in genetics, the hereditary aspects of some of these diseases, and the molecular diagnosis of haematological disorders is taught by our scientific community.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  1. To discuss critically the production of blood cells via haematopoiesis.
  2. Analyse the haemostasis and the diseases associated with bleeding disorders.
  3. To discuss an in-depth knowledge of blood transfusion.
  4. Critically discuss in-depth red cell disorders such as thalassaemia, sickle cell disease and the science behind haemoglobinopathies.
  5. Evaluate the latest developments in bone marrow failures.
  6. Critique the biology, and the scientific developments behind clinical advances in haematological therapeutics.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Examination 80%

Coursework 20%

Dept. responsible. Pathology Unit, Blizard Institute

Course organisers:

Dr Jurgen Groet, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Prof Joanne E. Martin, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The module covers the areas of brain injury due to mechanical trauma as well as neuro-degeneration, with emphasis on the research techniques that may be used to study the pathogenesis of disorders. These include the use of animal models of neurological disease, genetic mapping and gene expression techniques, as well as the field of proteomics.

Topics include: Genetic factors in disease including: non-Mendelian inheritance, genes and disease, genetic modelling of disease, and phenotype analysis, axonal transport, mechanisms of neuronal death. The general pathology of head injury, neuro-degeneration and demyelination, specific neuro-degenerative diseases, including: motor neuron, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s diseases, as well as technical aspects including: genomics and proteomics will be covered.

This is a taught module delivered through lectures. It will cover laboratory techniques designed to diagnose and model neuropathological diseases. This covers techniques such as PCR, imaging and animal models. The biology of neural cells will be covered such as demyelination, axonal transport, cell death pathways and stem cell replacement. Clinical aspects include trauma, Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson's Disease, motor neuron disease, Pick's disease and tauopathies.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

To understand the pathogenesis of head injury at a cellular and molecular level, and the sequence of events following on from the initial insult. To understand the use of animal models in the study of neurological disease. To understand neurodegeneration and some of the approaches used in the study of such disorders. To understand the principles of genetic and physical mapping, and the basis of the study of gene expression. The module will complement the syllabus in basic neurosciences, and is strongly linked at a technical and applied level to the clinical neurosciences.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Examination 100%

Dept. responsible. Pathology Unit, Blizard Institute

Course organiser:

Dr. J. Groet This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The project will normally be a piece of original research, which is expected to occupy at least half of the time throughout the course. It will normally involve experimental work or measurements on patients undergoing clinical investigation, and is presented as a written report. Students will also deliver a short oral presentation at the end of the first term, and then again at the completion of their project

The project is chosen from one or more of several broad subject areas such as:

  • Cardiovascular pathophysiology
  • Molecular genetics
  • Neuropathology
  • Tumour pathology
  • Vascular biomechanics

MODULE ASSESSMENT

The project is assessed by marking an 8000 word dissertation, which is written by the student. A presentation and viva voce form part of the assessment.

Module Leads:

Prof. Susan BrundageThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This module will provide a comprehensive overview of the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal and extremities vascular trauma. Particular attention will be given to cases of blunt and penetrating injuries to the extremities and the resultant vascular abnormalities.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • To use a critical and scientifically robust approach to plan patient care and to develop problem solving skills in the context of orthopaedic trauma.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Summative assessments occur weekly, and for each module will comprise of:

  • Multiple choice questions (MCQ) – Percentage weighting 20%
  • Written assignment of 1500 words (+-10%) – Percentage weighting 80% - minimum pass mark of 50%

 

Module Leads:

Dr Kash Akhtar, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mr Peter Bates, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This module will provide a solid background in the rapidly evolving area of critical care. Focusing on the physiological aspects of critically ill patients.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

Aims:

  • To develop a critical approach to the trauma patients in the setting of an intensive care unit. Where special attention will be given to "hot topics" such as shock therapy, ventilator management, infectious disease.
  • Learn advanced theoretical ground to help with the decision making process on critical care.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Summative assessments occur weekly, and for each module will comprise of:

  • Multiple choice questions (MCQ) – Percentage weighting 20%
  • Written assignment of 1500 words (+-10%) – Percentage weighting 80% - minimum pass mark of 50%

 

As part of QMUL, the Blizard are committed to providing education which is accessible to all. We aim to offer a number of competitive bursaries and scholarships for student’s studying our taught programmes. For full details on all opportunities offered by QMUL and externally, please see the web pages below:

Undergraduate: http://www.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduate/feesandfunding/index.html

Postgraduate: http://www.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/funding_masters/index.html

NEW FOR 2016-17: Student Finance England Postgraduate Loan Scheme

Student Finance England’s will be introducing a new loan scheme for many PGT students.

Click here to view the simple video which explains the application process and how repayments will work.

Click here to go to the SFE Student Finance Zone, where you can find details on all aspects of the loan scheme.

Undergraduate Opportunities

BSc Global Health Bursaries

Course:  BSc Global Health

Number available: 2 per academic year for home students. 1 per academic year for overseas students

Home Value: £9000 over 3 years for two home students (3000 per academic year)

Overseas Value: £18000 over 3 years for one overseas student (6000 per academic year)

Eligibility and Other details:

  • Based on financial need using the QMUL Bursaries Office criteria and chosen by a QMUL panel
  • The scholarship will be payable for three years subject to satisfactory academic progress, attitude, and attendance

How to Apply: All eligible UK applicants will be considered for the bursary

For Further Information please contact Emily McLean-Inglis (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Postgraduate Opportunities

Cannon Collins Scholarship (funded by the Simon and Deirdre Gaskell scholarship)

Course: MSc Global Public Health and Policy

Number available: 1 per academic year

Value/Package:                                          

  • Full tuition for a one-year masters in 2016-17
  • Monthly stipend
  • One economy class return flight from your home country
  • A settling-in allowance and other support while in the UK

Applicants must:

  • Be a national of, and normally resident in one of the following countries: Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, Zimbabwe.
  • Be in possession of a good Honours degree (minimum second class, upper division or equivalent) or about to graduate in the year of application
  • Be applying for the MSc in Global Public Health and Policy
  • Have at least 2 years work experience in a relevant field

Applications via the Cannon Collins website: (link to http://www.canoncollins.org.uk/apply/scholarship/canon-collins-scholarship-masters-study-uk)

For Further Information please contact Emily McLean-Inglis (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)


Santander Masters Scholarship

Courses:  Any Taught Masters Programme

Number Available: 1 per academic year

Value/Package: £3000

Eligibility and Other details:

  • Candidates wishing to apply for a Santander Masters Scholarship must hold an offer to study on a Masters Course at QMUL at the point of application.
  • Candidates must be expected to obtain the equivalent of at least a UK upper second-class degree.
  • Home, EU, and Overseas candidates are all eligible to apply, on the condition that they have studied for their first degree at a university within the Santander Universidades Network.
  • For a list of institutions within the network - which includes universities in Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, China, Colombia, Germany, Korea, Mexico, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Russia, Singapore, Spain, UK, UAE, USA and Uruguay - please see the Santander webpages.

How to Apply:

Please submit a completed application form found here

Along with the following supporting documents:

  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Letter of Reference (this can be a copy of one submitted as part of your master’s application or, if not available to you, you must obtain a reference specifically for this scholarship application).
  • Personal Statement (as per the application form).
  • Transcript of your current university qualifications (if you are still studying please indicate your expected final grade (or GPA) and date of graduation).

To Eleanor Browne by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The deadline for receipt of applications is 5pm (GMT) on Friday 20th May 2016

Candidates can expect to receive confirmation of receipt of their application within 48 hours and awardees will be informed of their success by Friday 17th June 2016.


Chevening Scholarships

Courses: Any Taught Masters at the Blizard

Number Available: 2 per academic year (1 x MSc Global Health Programmes, 1 x any other MSc at the Blizard)

Value: Full tuition fees, travel, monthly personal living allowance and other expenses. See Cheveing website (http://www.chevening.org/) for details.

Applicants Must:

  • Hold an unconditional offer from one of the three applicable courses selected on your application form by 14 July 2016.
  • Meet the Chevening English Language criteria http://www.chevening.org/apply/english-language-requirement

Applications and further details on funding via the Chevening website: (link to http://www.chevening.org/apply)


Commonwealth Scholarships

Courses:

Number available: 2 per academic year per programme

Value: Full Masters Tuition fee and some additional expenses (see commonwealth website for full details)

Applicants must

  • Have submitted a successful QMUL application to one of the applicable distance learning courses as listed
  • Be a permanent resident in a developing Commonwealth country (list here)

Applications must be made via the Commonwealth Scholarships website here and follow the Queen Mary, University of London relevant link. An online application form must be sent to the Commonwealth Scholarships office before 4th May 2016. Please note that a separate successful application to the programme via QMUL is also required.


LSEBN Burn Care Bursary

Course: PGCert Burn Care

Number available: 2 per academic year

Value: £1000

Eligibility and Other Details:

Applications will be open to any member of the LSEBN, including doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists.  Priority will be given to Nurses, Therapists and any other Allied Health Professionals (AHP) given the current lack of any bursaries to support their postgraduate education and their lower salary scales compared to medical personnel.  If no applications are received from this group, trainee doctors will then be considered.  Applicants will only be considered if they meet the minimum QMUL entry requirements for the PGCert Burn Care programme.  A formal QMUL course application will need to be made for any bursary application to be considered.

Applicants must submit the following documentation to the programme administrator (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

  • CV
  • Statement of Intent
  • Two references from senior colleagues

The Fulbright-QMUL Postgraduate Scholarship:

This covers full fees and living costs for one US student to study any non-distance learning masters course across QMUL. Details and application procedure are available here -

http://www.fulbright.org.uk/fulbright-awards/exchanges-to-the-uk/postgraduates/queen-mary-university-of-london


The QMUL Marshall Scholarship:

This covers full fees and living costs for one US student to study any non-distance learning masters course across QMUL. Details and application procedure are available here -

http://www.marshallscholarship.org/studyuk/queenmary


HESPAL

This covers full fees for one Palestinian student to study any non-distance learning masters course across QMUL. Details and applicant procedure are available here -

http://www.britishcouncil.ps/en/study-uk/scholarships/hespal

Module lead: Dr Sophie Harman
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This module will provide students with a conceptual and empirical understanding of global public health and the importance of its inter-relationship with international politics. The module is divided into two parts. The first part focuses on the historical relationship between global public health and international politics, conceptual understandings of health and disease, and emerging issues and international institutions that have come to dominate the field of international health. The second part of the course considers three case studies as a means for students to apply what they have learnt in the first section to more empirical research: HIV/AIDS, addiction (tobacco, drugs, illegality and war) and population (obesity, malnutrition, and populations control). By the end of the course students will have knowledge of conceptual understandings of public health; awareness of the key issues and debates; understanding of the role of states and international organisations; comprehensive knowledge of three health issues; and how these issues relate to wider understandings of global governance and international political economy.

The inter-connectedness of people and the growth of inequality from economic globalisation have led to new and complex health issues that threaten human and financial security. This course looks at conceptual and empirical understandings of global health and its increased importance to international politics. Students will study the complexity of health issues such as HIV/AIDS, tobacco, and obesity and how they have generated a particular form of international relations between states, international organisations, non-governmental actors, private philanthropists, and the body. The course will draw on questions of liberty, justice, and equality in how we think about health politics, how the United Nations aim of health for all can be realised, and what it really means.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

• Demonstrate conceptual and empirical knowledge of the complex inter-relationship between global health and international politics.
• Develop an understanding of the role of states, international organisations, private philanthropy and civil society in shaping and providing global health outcomes.
• Demonstrate detailed understanding of specific health issues and be able to conceptualise them within the context of global health.
• Articulate persuasive arguments that integrate empirical and theoretical material and enable constructive and critical discussion.
• Apply advanced understanding to problem-solving and critical theories of contemporary global health concerns
• Draw together research from global public health and politics and international relations

CORE READING

Key texts
• Elbe, Stefan. Security and global health. Cambridge: Polity, 2010.
• Evans, T. 2002. ‘A human right to health?’ Third World Quarterly 23(2): 197-215
• Global Health Watch. 2008. Global Health Watch 2 London: Zed Books
• Harman, S. 2012. Global Health Governance London: Routledge
• Lee, K., Buse, K., and Fustukian, S. 2002. Health Policy in a Globalising World Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
• Garrett, L. 2003. Betrayal of Trust: The collapse of global public health Oxford: Oxford University Press
47
• Glantz S. 2000. ‘The truth about big tobacco in its own words’ British Medical Journal 316:1553
• Green, J. and Labonte, R. 2007. Critical Perspectives in Public Health London: Routledge
• McCoy, D., Kembhavi, G., Patel, J., and Luintel, A. (2009). ‘The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s grant-making programme for global health’ The Lancet 373: 1645-1653
• McInnes, C. 2006. ‘HIV/AIDS and Security’ International Affairs 82(2):315-326
• McKee, M., Garner, P., and Stott, R. 2001. International Co-operation and health Oxford: Oxford University Press
• McNamara, Robert, ‘Population and International Security’, International Security, vol. 2, no. 2, Fall 1977, pp. 25-55.
• Nestle, Marion. 2002. Food Politics: How the food industry influences nutrition and health, London: University of California Press
• Pisani, E. 2008. The Wisdom of Whores: bureaucrats, brothels, and the business of AIDS London: Granta Books
• Shilts, R. 1987. And the Band Played On London: St Martins
• Stillwaggon, E. 2003. ‘Racial metaphors: interpreting sex and AIDS in Africa’ Development and Change 34(5): 809-832
• Wood, E. et al. 2009. ‘The war on drugs: a devastating public-policy disaster’ The Lancet 373 (9668)
• Youde, Jeremy. “Mediating risk through the International Health Regulations and biopolitical surveillance.” Political Studies 59,4 (2011): 813-829.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

(i) class presentation (15%); 3,000 word research essay (85%)

Module lead: Dr Miran Epstein
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The past four decades or so have seen the decline of local systems of medical ethics and their ongoing supersession by a single global new one, also known as ‘biomedical ethics’. The doctrine of informed consent, respect for the patient’s autonomy, the discourse on allocation of scarce resources, national and international oversight committees, and the academic-clinical discipline of bioethics - all are now accepted worldwide, reflecting a process of globalisation/harmonisation of medical ethics. This new globalised core ethic is supposed to regulate the relations both among health care providers—the state, the medical industry, health care and academic institutions, staff, and scientists—as well as between them and other stakeholders, notably the patient, the human researchee, and the public.

The module will take the student on a journey through seven major areas of contemporary medical ethics:
• consent and consensus
• medical confidentiality
• the discourse on distributive justice
• human and animal research ethics
• end-of-life ethics
• transplant ethics
• reproductive ethicsThe introductory presentation of each of these topics will be followed by a critical discussion on their possible history and on the theoretical and practical implications of the competing conclusions.

This module aims to:
• Construct general definitions of ethics and medical ethics and compare them with existing definitions.
• Construct a general historical theory of ethics.
• Show that medical ethics is actually being globalised, and to introduce its major elements.
• Show the critical advantage of a historical reflection on contemporary medical ethics over the traditional philosophical reflection.
• Present the major competing historical narratives concerning the emergence and evolution of the ethical transformation in medicine and assess the explanatory value of each.

This module differs from conventional modules on medical ethics in that it does not treat its object philosophically, but rather historically. Indeed, it attempts to define the ethical transformation in terms of both form and content, identify its social beneficiaries and victims, and provide competing historical explanations for its emergence and evolution.
The conclusions of the discussion will have no necessary philosophical, ie, justificatory, implications; however, they may cast a new counterintuitive light on the entire enterprise, and prompt us to reconsider our ethical and philosophical choices.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

• Develop an understanding of the nature of contemporary medical ethics and its major features
• Develop an understanding of the competing historical theories concerning the emergence and evolution of the new ethics
• Develop an understanding of the theoretical and practical implications of the historical narratives
• Develop an understanding of the advantage of history over philosophy as a critical tool in studying, assessing, and doing medical ethics.
• Describe the relations between philosophy and medical ethics
• Explain the difference between philosophical and historical discourses
• Outline the conditions for a plausible historical theory of medical ethics

CORE READING

Key texts
• Jackson E. Medical Law: Texts, Cases and Materials. OUP 2006.
• Brazier M. Medicine, Patients and the Law. 5th ed. Penguin 2011.
• Jonsen A. The Birth of Bioethics. OUP 2003.
• Jonsen A. A Short History of Medical Ethics. OUP 2008.
• Stevens T. Bioethics in America: Origins and Cultural Politics. Johns Hopkins Press 2003.
• Epstein M. How will the economic downturn affect academic bioethics? Bioethics 2010; 24(5): 226–233.
• Hope T, Savulescu J, Hendrick R. Medical Ethics: The Core Curriculum 2nd ed. Churchill Livingstone 2008.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

3,000 word essay style assignment (100%)

Module lead: Dr Elias Kondilis
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This is a compulsory module for the MSc health systems and global policy, and an elective module for the MSc global public health and policy, MSc, global health, law and governance, and MSc international primary health care.

The aim of this module is to examine methods and processes of health care system privatisation and to examine critically the consequences with respect to arrangements for risk pooling, equity, and efficiency.

This module will introduce students to the core concepts and theories of economic analysis that have underpinned the global trend towards health care reform. Conventional economic analyses of health policy will be examined and contrasted with public health approaches to health care planning. Particular attention is given to the impact of commercialisation on health care systems as a result of the international policy of increased private provision of public services. Closer involvement of the private sector in the planning and provision of public services has a range of practical and normative implications of which policy analysts need to be aware.

We examine the equity and cost effects of key financing and resource allocation methods associated with the health system reform agenda. Particular attention is given to the impact of commercialisation on the role and methods of health care needs assessment and needs-based resource allocation. Key reform concepts including integration and decentralisation are examined.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

• Critical understanding of theories of health sector privatisation
• Knowledge of comparative data on private sector participation in health care
• Systematic understanding of concepts and mechanisms of health service privatisation
• Systematic understanding of non-market methods of health service planning and resource allocation
• Critically analyse public and private control over resources in health care systems
• Critically appraise the consequences of public and private control in health care systems
• Synthesise findings with respect to equity of access and universal health care
• Develop a global perspective with respect to access to health care
• Develop a research and policy analysis capacity with respect to public health

CORE READING

Key texts
• Florio, M. (2004) Great divestiture: evaluating the welfare impact of the British privatizations, 1979-1997. MA: MIT Press
• Yescombe, E. (2007) Public private partnerships: principles of policy and finance. Butterworth-Heinemann
• Glennerster, H. (2003) Understanding the finance of welfare. Oxford: Policy Press.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

(i) group presentation (20%); (ii) 3,000 word assignment (80%)

Module Leads: 

Prof S I BrundageThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Prof K BrohiThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This module will provide grounding in the basic science of haemorrhage and shock, coagulopathy in trauma, and introduce concepts such as damage control resuscitation and surgery.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Learn the tools to evaluate different clinical situations and broaden the knowledge on diagnosis and management of shock syndrome. Particular attention will be on the deranged physiology underlying the onset of acute traumatic coagulopathy.
  • Learn the tools to recognise shock and start the appropriate treatment.
  • Analyse the most recent literature on fluid management and damage control resuscitation.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Summative assessments occur weekly, and for each module will comprise of:

  • Multiple choice questions (MCQ) – Percentage weighting 20%
  • Written assignment of 1500 words (+-10%) – Percentage weighting 80% - minimum pass mark of 50%

Module lead: Dr Dianna Smith
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This is a core module for the MSc global public health and policy, MSc, global health, law and governance, MSc international primary health care, and MSc health systems and global policy.

This module requires students to critically examine how global social, economic and political determinants influence health and health inequalities, both between and within countries. Students will examine the theories and evidence underpinning social inequalities in health, considering structural/material and psychosocial theories in from an individual and area-level context. The module goes on to examine how patterns in the distribution of health, as well as their determinants, are shaped by social, economic and other public policies, which in turn are shaped by a distribution of power and economic resources globally and nationally. Finally, it examines what actions are required to address the social determinants of health and to achieve reductions in health inequalities.

The module is intended to equip the student to be able to describe and critically examine the causes and the measurement of inequalities in health, and the nature and range of policy solutions available to remedy them. This module is intended to complement modules on epidemiology, the sociology of health and illness and health systems.

KEY LEARNING

Key learning outcomes
• Critical understanding of theories of social determinants of health
• Ability to describe the different mechanisms for social factors to influence health outcomes
• Critically analyse papers relating to health inequalities and social determinants of health
• Review findings with respect to policy interventions and determinants of health
• Explain the importance of discrete individual characteristics such as gender on health inequalities
• Describe the range of policy interventions to address health inequalities aimed at individuals and populations

CORE READING

Key module texts
• Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett (2010). The Spirit Level: Why Equality Is Better for Everyone. London: Penguin Books
• CSDH (2008). Closing the gap in a generation: health equity through action on the social determinants of health. Final Report of the Commission on Social Determinants of Health. Geneva, World Health Organization.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

2,000 word written assignment (50%); 2,000 word written assignment (50%)

Module lead: Dr Dave McCoy
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This is a core module for the MSc global public health and policy, MSc, global health, law and governance, MSc international primary health care, and MSc health systems and global policy.

This module will enable students to analyse and evaluate health care systems in both developed and developing countries from the perspective of access to diagnostic and curative services.

All governments accept some responsibility for the allocation of health care throughout society and none leaves allocation entirely to the market. This module is concerned with the theories behind and mechanisms of government and market control in the health care system, and with the resource distributions that result. By contrasting integrated public with market-based health systems, the module provides an essential grounding in the description and analysis of major trends in health care policy both within the United Kingdom and internationally and also with the World Health Organization commitment to ‘health for all’.
This module will address the fundamental public health question of how best to organise health care in order to achieve universal coverage. Particularly concerned will be given to the with the ways in which health care systems differ from the perspective of access to services among social groups within the population, and also with the distributive effects of different organising principles such as market and public control. Consideration will also be given to the arguments for market reforms as governments adopt policies of cost containment in health spending.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

• Develop an understanding of mechanisms for sharing the costs of ill health employed in different health systems.
• Develop an understanding of economic and public health theories underpinning cost-sharing models.
• Develop an understanding of standard methods for describing and comparing models of financial risk allocation, resource allocation, and needs-based planning.
• Analyse health care systems from the perspective of equity of access.
• Critically appraise evidence supporting health care policy.
• Synthesise findings with respect to equity of access and universal health care.
• Develop an understanding of research and policy analysis capacity for public health
• Develop a global perspective with respect to access to health care

CORE READING

Key texts
• Morris, S., Devlin, N., and Parkin, D. (2007) Economic analysis in health care. Chichester:Wiley.
• Donaldson, C. and Gerard, K. (2005) Economics of health care financing. 2nd ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
• Pollock, A. (2005) NHS plc. London: Verso.
• World Health Organization. (2005) Achieving universal health coverage. Technical note No 1. http://www.who.int/health_financing/pb_1.pdf.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

(i) presentation (30%); (ii) tutor marked assignment, 2,000 words (70%)

Module lead: Dr Colin Millard
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This is a core module for the MSc global public health and policy, MSc, global health, law and governance, MSc international primary health care, and MSc health systems and global policy.

The aims are

• to enable students to grasp how social theories can be brought to bear so as to extend understanding of health, illness and health care in contemporary societies
• to provide students with the methodological and analytical skills needed to formulate sociological and anthropological understanding of health, illness and health care
• to bring students to a point where the potential of sociological and anthropological work in helping to solve health and illness problems can be evaluated.

This module involves students in sociological and anthropological analyses of health and illness experiences, and the organisation and delivery of health care. Sociological and anthropological content focuses on topics including: the social context of illness, medicalisation and the medical model, illness experience, the clinical relationship, sociology of death and dying, the pharmaceutical industry, and global health.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module, we hope that students will be able to:
• define and analyse one or more sociological and/or anthropological problems related to health, illness or health care;
• understand the contribution of social and cultural factors and social context to the experience of health, illness and health care;
• critically analyse the relationship between medicine, health and society;
• apply social theories to the analysis of health, illness or health care in contemporary societies; and
• recognise that the boundaries of knowledge on particular topics are not fixed, and be able to deploy argument and lateral thinking to bring new literature to bear on a problem at hand.

CORE READING

Two to three key readings are provided for each week, which all students are expected to read.
The core textbook for this module is:
• Pool R, Geissler W. Medical anthropology. Maidenhead: Open University Press; 2005.
Students will also find the following useful:
Textbooks (all in the library)
• Helman, C (2007) Culture, Health, and Illness. London; New York, NY: Hodder Arnold.
• Lock, M. M., & Nguyen, V.K. (2010) An anthropology of biomedicine. Chichester, West Sussex; Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell
• Lupton D (2012) Medicine as culture: Illness, disease and the body. 3rd ed. London: Sage
• J Biehl and A Petryna (2013) When People Come First: Critical Studies in Global Health. Woodstock: Princeton
35
• R Fitzpatrick and SC Scrimshaw (Eds.) (2000). The Handbook of Social Studies in Health & Medicine. London: Sage.
Journals (all available through QMUL Library as electronic resources)
• Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
• Health: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness & Medicine
• Medical Anthropology Quarterly
• Sociology of Health & Illness
• Social Science & Medicine
• Qualitative Inquiry
• Qualitative Health Research
• Medical Anthropology
• Anthropology and Medicine

MODULE ASSESSMENT

(i) 2000 word essay (50%); (ii) 2,000 word essay (50%)

Module lead: Prof Richard Ashcroft
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This is a compulsory module for the MSc, global health, law and governance, and an elective module for the MSc global public health and policy, MSc international primary health care, and MSc health systems and global policy.

It aims to examine the normative and empirical bases for the protection and promotion of human rights and public health in their international contexts; and to analyse specific case studies in the field of health and human rights.

This module will introduce students to the core concepts and theories of international human rights law, ethics and policy that underpin contemporary global healthcare ethics and international public health practice. Particular attention is paid to: the legal normative basis of human rights and health; the interaction between the protection/promotion of public health and the protection/promotion of human rights; the international cooperative frameworks for health and human rights; the ethical debates around the human rights framework in general and specific case studies in health and human rights; and the institutional, economic and political challenges faced by health and human rights worldwide.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

• Develop a knowledge of the international legal basis for human rights
• Develop a knowledge of the ethical theories underpinning international human rights theory and practice
• Develop a knowledge of the empirical and theoretical bases for the inter-relationships of public health and human rights
• Critically appraise claims about the empirical connections between public health and human rights
• Critically appraise the normative claims made about and within human rights theory and practice
• Analyse the potential human rights impacts of interventions within public health practice

CORE READING

Key texts
• Solomon Benatar and Gillian Brock (eds.) Global Health and Global Health Ethics, Cambridge UP, 2011
• Michael Grodin (ed.) Health and Human Rights, Routledge, 2012

MODULE ASSESSMENT

3,000 word essay style assignment (100%)

Dept. responsible. Pathology Unit, Blizard Institute and William Harvey Research Institute

Course organisers:

Dr Jurgen Groet, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr Dianne Cooper, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Inflammation is central to many disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases are a major source of disability. The module will examine the scope of inflammatory disorders, the causes of inflammation, how to treat it and how it should be assessed, both experimentally and clinically. The principal aim is to understand the mechanisms and treatments of common chronic inflammatory disorders. The module will also cover a variety of additional topics in pathology. Material covered in many of the lectures will reflect the research interests of the speakers, and will include such diverse subjects as gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary tumours, and ageing and oncogenes.

Topics include: overview of inflammation, mechanisms of inflammatory pain, animal models of inflammation, gene and protein therapies based on animal studies, mediators of inflammation, regulation of acute inflammation, mechanisms of auto-immune disease, and neuro-endocrine immune regulation of inflammation. Special topics include: testicular and prostatic tumours, and pathology of the bladder and GI system.

This is a taught module delivered by lectures. The content includes the mechanisms of the inflammatory response, including how the response is initiated, what molecules drive this process and which cell types are involved. The role of inflammation in several pathologies including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, inflammatory bowel disease and transplant rejection are covered. Lectures are given on the use of anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents (NSAIDs, steroids and biological therapies) and their mechanisms of action. Students will be able to describe experimental models used to investigate both the mechanisms of inflammation and the development of new therapeutic drugs. Histological descriptions are illustrated by clinical pathologists of the genito-urinary tract, the gastrointestinal tract, as well as aging and oncogene expression including any inflammation at sites of disease.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

The main aim of this module is to understand the pathogenesis of inflammatory disease. The module offers students the opportunity to see how the theoretical ideas concerning the causes of acute and chronic inflammation are applied to the understanding of common forms of inflammatory disease. It allows them to explore aspects of the subject to a greater depth than is normally possible in the clinical course. It also explores topics in pathology and the role of pathologists to help students understand this branch of medicine.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Examination 100%

Module convener:                           

Michele BranscombeThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.          

Other Key Staff:                              

Professor Olwyn Westwood

This module is the first module undertaken and will consolidate knowledge gained by students during undergraduate studies and will ensure a solid basis upon which the first work placement can take place. Underpinning the need for inter-professional activities some tuition may be with GEP medical students or MSC clinical microbiology students.
Students will develop an awareness of the professional responsibilities of the clinical scientist and their role within the wider NHS.
Infectious Disease specific elements of the course will include basic laboratory training.

The module aims to prepare students for their first work placement. As students have a diverse background a period of consolidation and reinforcement of current knowledge is undertaken which includes preparation for the role of scientist within the NHS.
It is anticipated that students will become active members of NHS staff whilst on work placement and therefore this module ensures that students have a firm understanding of basic skills required to behave safely within a category 2 laboratory and are also aware of the further training they would require from the work placement.

 

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will have a knowledge and understanding of:

  • the structure and function of the major organs and systems of the human body in health and disease.
  • the principles of human genetics
  • the concept of commensal and pathogenic organisms
  • professional behaviour as a clinical scientist
  • the role of health economics and apply them to healthcare science and to the general population.

At the end of this module students will have intellectual skills which will enable them to:

  • apply basic principles of communication with patients and healthcare professionals including history taking and clinical examination where relevant.
  • understand the importance of the concept of shared leadership and the associated personal qualities and behaviours that promote shared leadership.
  • explain the structure and management of health and social care services and the management of local healthcare systems in the United Kingdom.

At the end of this module students will have the following transferable skills and will be able to:

  • apply a range of study skills including time management, organisational skills, using the library, search engines, self-directed learning, reflective practice and critical analysis
  • demonstrate communication skills by listening to others, taking other viewpoints into consideration, giving effective feedback, receiving and responding to feedback and working in a team.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the influence of culture and beliefs on health.

At the end of this module students will have the following practical skills and will be able to:

  • work safely in a category 2 microbiology laboratory environment
  • demonstrate the application of sterile technique
  • demonstrate basic skills which will enable the student to participate fully in their professional rotations in the work place.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:
Kumar and Clark's Clinical Medicine ed: Kumar and Clark published by Saunders Ltd
Oxford Handbook of clinical medicine ed: Longmore published by OUP

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Report

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 3000 words
Percentage weighting in module: 30%

Practical Key Skills

Type of assessment: Practical
Duration: 90 minutes
Percentage weighting in module: 30%

Professional reflection

Type of assessment: Professional Capability
Duration: 3000 words
Percentage weighting in module: 40%

Module lead: Prof Johanna Gibson
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This seminar-based module examines the categories of intellectual property and the sources of intellectual property law (national, regional, and international) relevant to medical research, development and public health. In particular, the module examines the way in which intellectual property developments interact with ethical and socio-economic aspects of medicine, development and human rights (in particular the right to health, the right to development and access to medicines). Students will be introduced to patent law, trademarks and other related aspects of intellectual property laws relevant to medical innovation, research, and public health. Discussion topics will consider especially the relationship between intellectual property frameworks and the various industries contributing to medical innovation, the possible interaction with research practices and developments, and the consequences for various questions of public health, including individual property, access to products and information and human rights in health and development.

The module is intended to introduce students to the wider socio-economic and policy environment for legal regulation of medicines and their commercial markets, with a particular emphasis on intellectual property, pharmaceuticals and access to medicine. Students will also be provided with the tools to understand the various overlapping and conflicting rights, in particular competition law and human rights, including the right to health, right to development, right to cultural participation and access to medicines. The module is intended to equip students with the skills to examine critically the social, economic, cultural and political factors for intellectual property, global health and access to medicines. Students will also be exposed to the necessary critical tools for relevant and comprehensive policy analysis, debate and development in the relevant areas of intellectual property and health.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

• Critical understanding of the rationale and operation of intellectual property in the health industries
• Critical understanding of the relevant socio-economic and legal context for intellectual property, including human rights and competition
• Ability to appraise critically relevant policy, legal, economic and other arguments related to intellectual property and health
• Critically analyse papers relating to intellectual property and health
• Critically appraise the consequences of different policy and legal interventions
• Review current developments and consider future developments with respect to policy interventions, legal developments as well as developments in international trade and public health
• A global perspective with respect to access to medicinal products and public health
• Research and policy analysis capacity with respect to the socio-economic, cultural and policy aspects of intellectual property and public health

CORE READING

• Gibson J (2009) Intellectual Property, Medicine and Health: Current Debates, Farnham, Ashgate

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Two-hour examination (100%)

Module convener:         

Michele Branscombe, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   

Other Key Staff:              

Dr Mathias Dittmar, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Mr James Winch

This module introduces the clinically important bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi.
The lectures focus on recent developments in classification, pathogenicity and identification of these organisms.
The lectures are studied in conjunction with the practical sessions of the core diagnostic microbiology and laboratory methods module to develop a complete understanding of the organism, mechanisms of pathogenicity and laboratory diagnosis of clinically important micro-organisms.

This module offers the student a thorough knowledge and understanding of the major bacteria, parasites, viruses and fungi which can cause disease in humans. This knowledge is to include an understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis and identification.
As well as pathogens common in the UK the students is encouraged to develop a knowledge of microbial agents of tropical disease and also new and emerging pathogens.

The student learns to identify clinically important bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi. The practicals focus on both traditional and modern molecular techniques for the identification of these organisms. 

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will have a knowledge and understanding of:

  • The major bacteria, parasites, viruses and fungi which can cause disease in humans. This knowledge is to include an understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis and identification.
  • The global distribution of organisms and the significance of this distribution in disease in the population in the UK, in travellers and in the global population.
  • New and emerging pathogens.
  • How to identifying the major human pathogens and commensal bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi using microscopy, biochemical and molecular tests.
  • How to evaluate new techniques and tests for use in research and in the diagnostic laboratory
  • the role of the clinical microbiology laboratory in the provision of information for management and treatment of bacterial infections.

At the end of this module students will have intellectual skills which will enable them to:

  • Evaluate new techniques and tests for use in research and in the diagnostic laboratory.
  • Describe the design, operation and performance of a range of techniques, including test selection, used in the identification of bacteria, parasites, fungi and viruses.
  • Understand the partnership between the clinical microbiology laboratory and other clinical specialisms in the investigation of microbial infection.

At the end of this module students will have the following transferable skills and will be able to:

  • Work safely in a containment level 2 laboratory with human samples and pathogens
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the current health and safety issues relating to containment level 3 and 4 laboratories.
  • Identify the major human pathogens and commensal bacteria, parasites, viruses and fungi using microscopy, biochemical, serology and molecular tests.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how to evaluate new techniques and tests for use in research and in the diagnostic laboratory.
  • Demonstrate experience of the interpretation and reporting of laboratory results in the context of important microbial infections.
  • Present complex ideas in simple terms in both oral and written formats
  • work in partnership with colleagues, other professionals, patients and their carers to maximise patient care.
  • At the end of this module students will have the following practical skills and will be able to:
  • Identify the major human pathogens and commensal bacteria, parasites, viruses and fungi using microscopy, biochemical, serology and molecular tests.
  • demonstrate the ability to apply the principles of internal quality control and external quality assessment and draw conclusions about assay performance
  • Perform within the sphere of personal competence and whilst conducting diagnostic, investigative or monitoring procedures demonstrate due care for the safety of self and others.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:

Murray et al: Manual of clinical microbiology
or
de la Maza et al: Colour Atlas of clinical microbiology.
or
Bailey and Scotts Diagnostic microbiology

Campbell et al: Identification of pathogenic fungi

or
Larone: Medically important fungi: a guide to identification

Garcia: Practical guide to diagnostic parasitology

or
Zeibig: Clinical parasitology: A practical approach

Kudesia and Wreghitt: Clinical diagnostic virology.

or
Specter et al: Clinical virology manual

Suggested journals include:

Journal of clinical virology
Virology
Trends in parasitology

Suggested websites include:
http://www.mycology.adelaide.edu.au/

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Mycology Essay

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 3000 words
Percentage weighting in module: 15%

Parasitology SAQ

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 1 hour
Percentage weighting in module: 10%

Virology Essay

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 4000 words
Percentage weighting in module: 20%

Bacteriology Paper

Type of assessment: Examination
Duration: 2 hours
Percentage weighting in module: 20%

Wet practical and SAQ

Type of assessment: Examination
Duration: 3 hours
Percentage weighting in module: 35%

 

Module Co-ordinators:

Dr Alicia Green, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr Debra Marcos, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This module provides teaching of the principles and practical skills required in endoscopy. It is intended as an update for those with some experience of endoscopy, and an introduction for novices allowing them to accelerate further training after completing this module.

The main details of the module are as follows:

  • Understanding of main diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy techniques.
  • Recognition of normal and pathological endoscopy images.
  • Understanding of principles of endoscopy equipment.
  • Knowledge of the processes consent, preparation and sedation of the patients.
  • Understanding of complications of endoscopy.
  • Organisation and running an endoscopy service.
  • Training in endoscopy.
  • Basic knowledge of interpretation of a videocapsule endoscopy

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

This module provides teaching of the principles required in endoscopy. It is intended as an update for those with some experience of endoscopy, and an introduction for novices
allowing them to accelerate further training after completing this module.

  1. Understanding of main diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy techniques.
  2. Recognition of normal and pathological endoscopy images.
  3. Understanding of principles of endoscopy equipment.
  4. Knowledge of the processes consent, preparation and sedation of the patients.
  5. Understanding of complications of endoscopy.
  6. Organisation and running an endoscopy service.
  7. Training in endoscopy.
  8. Basic knowledge of interpretation of a videocapsule endoscopy

CORE READING

Practical GI Endoscopy: Cotton and Williams

Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: Classen and Tytgat

MODULE ASSESSMENT

One examination lasting 1 hour. This module exam is worth 60% of the mark for the module, with the remaining 40% constituted by coursework, which will be set at the start of the module. The coursework assignment [essay] will have a maximum of 2000 words, or an oral presentation or a poster presentation to the examiner.

Module lead: Prof Maxine Robertson
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Innovation is a process and it is the primary source of competitive advantage in knowledge-based economies. The management of innovation is inherently difficult and risky: most new technologies fail to be translated into products or services, and most new products and services are not commercial successes. In this integrative module we will explore the reasons why this is the case by exploring the innovation process in-depth. We will consider what might be done to improve the chances of 'success' and demonstrate that a behavioural approach rooted in the concept of managing knowledge, in and across organizations, is fundamental to managing innovation. This module will be of interest to any student with an interest in organisational behaviour and/ or organisational theory.

Module assessment

(i) assignment (40%); examination (60%)

Module convener:        

Michele Branscombe, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This is a compulsory module for the MSc Biomedical Science (medical microbiology) and is required for accreditation of the degree by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS).

The students will study and reflect on:

  • Good management practice
  • Legislation relevant to diagnostic laboratories
  • Health and safety in the laboratory
  • Development of standard operating procedures
  • Quality assurance in the laboratory
  • LEAN evaluation and Audit processes
  • Methods of evaluation of new methods for use in the diagnostic laboratory
  • Have a knowledge of the role of new technologies e.g. molecular and automation in the diagnostic laboratory.
  • Understand of the role of the diagnostic laboratory within the NHS and with external agencies such as the HPA and WHO.
  • Occupational health

The module aims to prepare students for their role as managers of laboratories within the NHS.

  • Students will be introduced to current legislation for health and safety with relation to biohazards and COSHH.
  • Students will understand the concepts of standard operating procedures and quality assurance and will develop skills necessary to produce relevant documents for laboratories.
    Students will develop an awareness of worldwide infectious disease and implications for public health and communicable disease control in the UK in relation to visitors to the UK and UK residents travelling overseas
  • An overview of the role of vaccination in communicable disease control within the UK.
  • An understanding of the threat of bioterrorism in the UK, possible agents and the role of the clinical microbiology in control of such an event.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Understand the legal framework of Health and Safety within a laboratory including the development of SMI and COSHH documentation
  • Evaluate quality assurance data for laboratory practices and be aware of suitable corrective actions when indicated by the data
  • develop and knowledge and understanding of the audit cycle and the importance of clinical audit in improving patient care, multidisciplinary working and in optimising laboratory medicine service provision and contribute to and take an active part in the performance of a clinical audit that involves completion of the audit cycle
  • Demonstrate the importance of multidisciplinary working in the design, delivery and optimisation of improved laboratory medicine services
  • Understand the scientific basis and techniques required to add to current knowledge in the development and assessment of new technologies

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:
Biomedical Science Practice: Experimental and professional skills Glencross et al Oxford Press 2010

Laboratory management: Quality in Laboratory Diagnosis Kinkus Demos medical publishers 2012

Fundamentals of Risk management: Understanding, evaluating and implementing effective risk management Hopkin Institute of Risk Management 2012

Suggested websites include:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/standards-for-microbiology-investigations-smi

www.hse.gov.uk

www.nice.org.uk

www.who.int

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Management Case Study (Part time students)
Extended management essay (Full time students)

Part time students: The case study is a reflective report on your participation in a laboratory management process eg. Audit, LEAN task.
Full time students will write an extended essay based on a management topic.

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 3000 words
Percentage weighting in module: 50%

End of module written assessment

This is an end of module exam paper taken at the end of the module.

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 90 minutes
Percentage weighting in module: 50%

Module Co-ordinators:

Prof Graham Foster, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr Debra Marcos, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr Alicia Green, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

In this module we look into :

  • Normal and abnormal liver, pancreatic and biliary anatomy and histology. Physiology of bile and gall stone formation.
  • The aetiopathogenesis of liver, biliary and pancreatic disease.
  • The clinical presentation and management of liver, biliary and pancreatic diseases: Non alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver disease in pregnancy. Metals and liver. Autoimmune liver disease. Drug-induced liver disease. Alcoholic liver disease.
  • The principles and practice underlying the management of portal hypertension, cirrhosis and liver failure.
  • The importance of hepatotropic viruses as a cause of chronic liver diseases, the natural history, clinical presentation and management of hepatitis B and C. The methods used to evaluate new anti-viral agents and their strengths and weaknesses. How interferon works.
  • Liver cancer: chemotherapy approaches and surgical aspects
  • Imaging of the liver and pancreas Biliary and pancreatic disease. Pancreatic surgery. Benign liver lesions.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  •  Understanding the aetiopathogenesis of liver, biliary and pancreatic disease
  • Understand the clinical presentation and management of liver,biliary and pancreatic diseases
  • To understand the mechanisms of liver disease
  • To understand the principals and practice underlying the management of portal hypertension, cirrhosis and liver failure.
  • Understanding the methods used to evaluate new anti-viral agents and their strengths and weaknesses.  Papers
  • Revise normal and abnormal liver histology
  • Appreciate the importance of hepatotropic viruses as a cause of chronic liver diseases and understand the natural history of hepatitis B and C
  • Liver Cancer: Chemotherapy approaches and Surgical aspects

CORE READING

  • Sherlock and Dooley: Diseases of the Liver and Biliary system
  • Foster and Goldin: Management of Chronic Viral Hepatitis

MODULE ASSESSMENT

One examination lasting 1.5 or 2 hours. This module exam is worth 60% of the mark for the module, with the remaining 40% constituted by coursework, which will be set at the start of the module. The coursework assignment [essay] will have a maximum of 2000 words, or an oral presentation or a poster presentation to the examiner.

Module lead: Dr Colin Millard
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This is a compulsory module for the MSc global public health and policy. This is a compulsory module for the MSc health systems and global policy, MSc, global health, law and governance, and MSc international primary health care.

This module aims to give students an understanding of the key socio-environmental determinants of health and health inequality. It will cover concepts fundamental to the study of population health from geographical, sociological, and epidemiological literatures and will allow you to engage with the recent emphasis on understanding group-level contextual (ecological) social and physical determinants of health (e.g. built environment, community social capital, racism and discrimination) . In addition, the section will examine key theoretical concepts such as deprivation amplification, explore the relative merits of psycho-social and neo-materialist approaches, and introduce recent debates relating to the eco-social perspective.

This module explores the socio-ecological determinants of poor health, death, and disease in the nations that constitute the global North. The section begins by introducing you to the broad topic of the social determinants of health and to the importance of population level (ecological) explanations. Additionally, you will be introduced to debates relating to ‘context’ and ‘composition’ and the development of eco-social theory. Once in place, the section moves on to explore specific determinants of health inequalities: income, social capital and community cohesion, discrimination, and the built environment. Each of these sessions will draw on specific examples to help illustrate the key themes being explored. This part of the module is then brought to a conclusion in two ways: firstly, you are encouraged to engage with dominant explanations for the inequalities that we observe and, secondly, to consider public health interventions designed to overcome them.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

• Critically analyse key theoretical concepts and debates relating to population health, such as health inequality, context and composition, and psycho-social, neo-materialist and eco-social perspectives
• Develop an understanding of the contribution of population-level socio-environmental factors to the distribution and determinants of health behaviours and disease.
• Define and analyse a population-level problem related to health behaviour and disease.
• Apply geographical and social scientific approaches to the analysis of health and disease in contemporary societies
• Apply population-level theories to the analysis and understanding of contemporary problems of public health
• Apply a critical social science perspective in an interdisciplinary context
• Interpret complex data and ideas, present and discuss key concepts, and work independently and within small groups in the classroom setting
• Interpret and evaluate scholarship from a range of different disciplinary perspectives
• Gain written communication skills

CORE READING

Key texts
• Curtis, S. (2004) Health and Inequality: Geographical Perspectives. London: Sage.
• Macintyre, S., Ellaway, A., Cummins S (2002) Place effects on health: how can we conceptualise, operationalise and measure them? Social Science & Medicine 55, 125-139.
• Marmot, M. (2005) The Impact of Inequality: How to Make Sick Societies Healthier. London: Bloomsbury.
• Krieger, N (2011) Epidemiology and the People’s Health: Theory and Context, Oxford University Press.
• Rose, G. (2001) Sick individuals and sick populations. International Journal of Epidemiology 30, 427-32.
• Szreter, S., Woolcock, M. (2004) Health by association? Social capital, social theory, and the political economy of public health. International Journal of Epidemiology 33, 650-67.
• Wilkinson, R.G. (1996) Unhealthy Societies: The Afflictions of Inequality. London: Routledge
• Wilkinson, R.G. (2005) The Impact of Inequality: How to Make Sick Societies Healthier. London: New Press.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

(i) presentation (20%); (ii) 2,500 word assignment (80%)

Module Leads:

Dr Christos Giannou

This module for Military and Humanitarian Masters will provide a background into both military and civilian humanitarian events.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • To learn triage, pre-hospital care, mass casualty management and surge capacity, ballistics, chemical and biological trauma.
  • Propose and critically evaluate the latest techniques by the military.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Summative assessments occur weekly, and for each module will comprise of:

  • Multiple choice questions (MCQ) – Percentage weighting 20%
  • Written assignment of 1500 words (+-10%) – Percentage weighting 80% - minimum pass mark of 50%

 

Module convener:            

Dr Olivier Marches, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Other Key Staff:              

Professor Lucinda Hall, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Professor Dan Pennington (Host immune response), This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This module offers the student teaching and workshops covering the principles of molecular biology, the biology of bacteria, and explores the use of current molecular techniques in the research and diagnosis of infectious disease. The human immune system is studied followed by a study of the interaction of micro-organisms with the host immune system.

The module aims to provide:

  • An understanding of bacterial metabolism and physiology.
  • An understanding of bacterial genetics and gene regulation
  • An understanding of current molecular biology techniques; how and why they are used within research and diagnostic laboratories.
  • An understanding of bacterial pathogenesis
  • A thorough grounding in human immunology.
  • An understanding of the interaction between the host immune response and microorganisms in health and disease.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will have a knowledge and understanding of:

  • bacterial structure and function and the relevance to the diagnostic laboratory.
  • bacterial genetics and gene regulation.
  • bacterial pathogenesis
  • human immunology.
  • molecular techniques applicable to bacterial diagnostics

At the end of this module students will have intellectual skills which will enable them to:

  • Explain current molecular biology techniques used in diagnostic and research laboratories and evaluate new developments in this field for use in clinical microbiology.
  • Describe the design, operation and performance of a range of molecular investigations used in the detection and management of microbial infections.
  • Evaluate results from molecular tests to assist with diagnosis and advice on therapy.
  • Critically read research articles and evaluate their conclusions.
  • At the end of this module students will have the following transferable skills and will be able to:
  • Work safely in a containment level 2 laboratory with human samples and pathogens
  • Understand appropriate quality management systems
  • Apply and interpret DNA-based methodologies appropriately in different contexts.

At the end of this module students will have the following practical skills and will be able to:

  • Conduct a suitable range of diagnostic, investigative or monitoring procedures with due care for the safety of self and others.
  • Interpret results from PCR and DNA sequence determination
  • Explore DNA sequence databases, compare sequences, and interpret results obtained
  • demonstrate the ability to apply the principles of internal quality control and external quality assessment and draw conclusions about assay performance
  • perform within the sphere of personal competence and whilst conducting diagnostic, investigative or monitoring procedures demonstrate due care for the safety of self and others.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:
W. Dale S. F. Park : Molecular Genetics of Bacteria
or
 Madigan et al: Brock Biology of Microorganisms,
or
Prescott, Harley and Klein's Microbiology

Pier et al: Immunology, infection and immunity
or
Janeway et al: Immunobiology. The immune system in health and disease
or
Salyers and Whitt: Bacterial pathogenesis a molecular approach.

Relevant reviews from journals such as Trends and Current Opinion series

Relevant recent primary research articles

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Structured questions/MCQ

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 40 questions
Percentage weighting in module: 60%

Abstract writing

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 2 hours
Percentage weighting in module: 40%

 

Module convener          

Dr Olivier Marches, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Other Key Staff:              

Professor Lucinda Hall, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Professor  Dan Pennington (Host immune response), This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

This module offers the student teaching and workshops covering the principles of molecular biology, the biology of bacteria and explores the use of current molecular techniques in the research and diagnosis of infectious disease. The human immune system is studied followed by a study of the interaction of micro-organisms with the host immune system.

The module aims to provide:

  • An understanding of bacterial metabolism and physiology.
  • An understanding of bacterial genetics and gene regulation.
  • An understanding of current molecular biology techniques; how and why they are used within research and diagnostic laboratories
  • An understanding of bacterial pathogenesis
  • A thorough grounding in human immunology
  • An understanding of the interaction between the host immune response and micro-organisms in health and disease.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of bacterial metabolism and physiology and the relevance to the diagnostic laboratory.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of bacterial genetics and gene regulation.
  • Explain current molecular biology techniques used in diagnostic and research laboratories and evaluate new developments in this field for use in clinical microbiology.
  • Discuss mechanisms by which bacteria damage their host.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of human immunology
  • Explain the pathogenesis of organisms in patients with a normal immune system and those patients who are immunocompromised.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:
W. Dale S. F. Park : Molecular Genetics of Bacteria
or
 Madigan et al: Brock Biology of Microorganisms,
or
Prescott, Harley and Klein's Microbiology

Pier et al: Immunology, infection and immunity
or
Janeway et al: Immunobiology. The immune system in health and disease
or
Salyers and Whitt: Bacterial pathogenesis a molecular approach.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Molecular multiple choice questions (MCQ)

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration:1 hour

Percentage weighting in module: 25%

End of Module Paper

Type of assessment: Formal examination
Duration: 90 minutes
Percentage weighting in module: 75%

Module Co-ordinators:

Professor Quasim Aziz, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Professor Daniel Sifrim, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The aims of the course are to enable course members to gain some understanding in relation to Neurogastroenterology and Motility as follows:

  • Approach to patients with Functional GI disorders
  • Current and developing treatment of Functional GI disorders
  • Upper and Lower GI physiological measurements
  • Upper and Lower GI Motility
  • Neurophysiology and mechanisms of visceral pain
  • Neuroendocrine control of gastric sensory/motor function
  • Molecular aspects of visceral sensory and motor function
  • Pathophysiology of oesophageal disorders
  • Mechanisms of nausea, bloating , vomiting, gastroparesis and epigastric pain
  • Techniques to study small bowel motor function
  • Sphincter of Oddi function and dysfunction and its management
  • Hirschsprung Disease and anorectal malformations
  • Approach to Surgical Treatment  for GI Functional Disorders
  • Pseudo-Intestinal Obstruction and its management
  • Psychological aspects of functional disorders
  • Modulation of visceral pain by psychological factors
  • Ability to discuss some practical cases
  • Research in Progress

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the brain-gut axis communication, the neural pathways involved and the type of information that is encoded by each pathway.
  2. Explain the relationship between intestinal microbiota and the immune system with the central nervous system.
  3. Identify hormones, neurotransmitters and receptors that mediate GI functions.
  4. Recognise neurophysiological techniques that can be used to study gut sensation.
  5. Identify metabolic and systemic conditions that can affect sensory and motor functions of the GI tract.
  6. Outline the differences in the presentation of visceral pain compared to somatic pain. Describe the functional anatomy of visceral pain processing and how this correlates to the key features of visceral pain. Understand the concept of visceral hypersensitivity, hyperalgesia, allodynia and appreciate the contribution of peripheral sensitisation (PS) and central sensitisation (CS) to these states. Be able to give examples of molecular mediators and how they participate in PS.
  7. Understand that there are different classes of anti-emetic drugs with different sites of action. Appreciate that nausea is not the same as vomiting. Know the main drugs used to treat gastroparesis.
  8. Understand that the gastrointestinal tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body. Appreciate that different gastrointestinal hormones are released during hunger and after eating and that they have different main roles.
  9. Describe the different mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Explain the differences between erosive reflux  disease, non-erosive reflux disease and functional heartburn. Know current and developing treatment of GORD.
  10. Describe the properties of the oesophageal epithelium that protect against reflux damage. Discuss the evidence implying that changes in mucosal integrity occur in non-erosive reflux.
  11. Know the principles and indications of GI physiology techniques: standard oesophageal manometry, oesophageal high resolution manometry, impedance testing, oesophageal pH monitoring, bilitec, gastric emptying studies and small bowel manometry.
  12. Recognise functional GI disorders causing diarrhoea and differential diagnosis. Describe the diagnosis, management approach and treatment options of small bacterial overgrowth.
  13. Define chronic constipation and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and recognised investigations used in the diagnosis of these disorders. Understand that there are different classes of laxative drugs. Know current treatment of constipation.
  14. Define Sphincter of Oddi function and dysfunction and its management.
  15. Define Hirschsprung disease and anorectal malformations.
  16. Understand psychological aspects of functional gastro-oesophageal disorders and the modulation of visceral pain by psychological factors.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

One examination lasting 1 hour. This module exam is worth 60% of the mark for the module, with the remaining 40% constituted by coursework, which will be set at the start of the module. The coursework assignment [essay] will have a maximum of 2000 words, or an oral presentation or a poster presentation to the examiner.

Module Co-ordinators:

Dr Nick Croft, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Prof Ian Sanderson, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This module serves as a thorough overview of gastrointestinal and liver diseases in children and adolescents and gastrointestinal infectious diseases.

The aims of this module are to provide understanding and knowledge of the common and unusual diseases of the gastrointestinal, hepato-biliary, pancreatic tracts in children and adolescents, and infectious diseases of the GI tract. There is a focus on the science and research underpinning the diseases

  • GI and liver preclinical sciences (e.g. embryology, anatomy, post natal development, physiology) and the abnormalities of this development.
  • Ethics and practicalities of research in children.
  • Normal and abnormal growth and puberty. Normal and abnormal nutrition.
  • Acute infective diarrhoea in children.
  • Chronic diarrhoea and enteropathy (Coeliac disease, etc)
  • Congenital chronic intractable diarrhoea
  • CF and the Gut, pancreatic insufficiency
  • Functional GI Diseases in children.
  • Food allergy and intolerance
  • Rectal bleeding including polyps syndromes
  • Inflammatory bowel disease, Adult versus paeds, growth and bones and enteral feeds. Clinical assessment of intestinal immunity
  • Cholestatic jaundice (the yellow baby). Hepatitis
  • Chronic liver disease and liver transplantation  in childhood
  • Malnutrition in children. Intestinal failure, short gut and small bowel transplantation
  • Indication and complications of parenteral nutrition. Feeding and swallowing difficulties in children (including oesophageal dysmotility, achalasia)
  • GI Infections and tropical gastroenterology: immunity against organisms, mucosal vaccines. Bacterial, protozoal and viral infections.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this module students should be able to:

  1. Describe common and unusual diseases of the gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary and pancreatic tracts in children and adolescents,
  2. Discuss the pathogenesis and management of infectious diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.
  3. Develop skills of enhanced clinical decision-making in this area

CORE READING

Pediatric GI Diseases (Kleinman, Goulet et al)

Pediatric GI and Liver Diseases (Wylie, Hyams)

MODULE ASSESSMENT

One examination lasting 1.5 or 2 hours. This module exam is worth 60% of the mark for the module, with the remaining 40% constituted by coursework, which will be set at the start of the module. The coursework assignment [essay] will have a maximum of 2000 words, or an oral presentation or a poster presentation to the examiner.

 

Module Leads:

Dr Kash Akhtar, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mr Peter Bates, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This module will provide a comprehensive overview of the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal and extremities vascular trauma. Particular attention will be given to cases of blunt and penetrating injuries to the extremities and the resultant vascular abnormalities.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • To use a critical and scientifically robust approach to plan patient care and to develop problem solving skills in the context of orthopaedic trauma.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Summative assessments occur weekly, and for each module will comprise of:

  • Multiple choice questions (MCQ) – Percentage weighting 20%
  • Written assignment of 1500 words (+-10%) – Percentage weighting 80% - minimum pass mark of 50%

Module convener:           

Michele Branscombe, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.         

Other Key Staff:                              

Professor Lucinda Hall, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

This module is designed to give the student a thorough background to the principles of scientific research to equip them to undertake relevant research within the NHS as an individual and as part of a research team.

This module is designed to give the student a thorough underpinning knowledge of the importance of research, development and innovation across the NHS and in healthcare science. Using this knowledge the student will be able to undertake relevant scientific research within the NHS.

Students will learn about the importance of ethics for a project and understand the legal framework in which research with patients and/or patient samples must be undertaken.

Students will develop the skills to present their research both to fellow healthcare professionals and to non scientific audiences.

The process of developing clinical guidelines from research results will be explored.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will have a knowledge and understanding of:

  • the context within which research and audit are undertaken within the NHS and examine the contribution of the Healthcare Science workforce to undertaking cutting edge translational research for patient benefit and promoting innovation within the NHS.
  • the difference between audit and research and know different types of research approaches including qualitative, quantitative and systematic review.
  • current ethical approval processes for research and audit, the requirements for continuous monitoring, progress reporting, adverse event monitoring, study closure and archiving.

At the end of this module students will have intellectual skills which will enable them to:

  • understand how clinical guidelines are produced and the concept of evidence based practice including the role of current statutory and advisory regulatory bodies.
  • explain the processes for quality assurance in research, audit and service improvement.
  • describe the potential sources of research funding for Healthcare Science research and basic principles of Intellectual Property regulations.

At the end of this module students will have the following transferable skills and will be able to:

  • Explain the processes that underpin clinical trials and their potential value, risks and benefits
  • formulate a research question and design a project.
  • participate in peer review and user involvement in research design.
  • demonstrate effective oral communication skills including the ability to present scientific data to non-scientists.
  • identify how innovation will have a positive impact on the practice of healthcare science.
  • perform as a professional researcher within the healthcare setting.
  • At the end of this module students will have the following practical skills and will be able to:
  • prepare a project proposal including the ethical approval mechanism in the NHS.
  • present research findings in oral and written forms including scientific presentations
  • Critically review the literature to establish current knowledge with respect to a research question and summarise the findings.
  • Identify and discuss an audit project that has resulted in change specific to their specialism.
  • Identify and discuss a research study that has resulted in an improvement in patient care relevant to their specialism.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:

Dytham: Choosing and using statistics: A biologists guide.Harris: Medical statistics made easy
Bjorn: How to Write and Illustrate a Scientific Paper
Katz: From research to manuscript: A guide to Scientific Writing
Dytham: Choosing and using statistics: A biologists guide
Harris: Medical statistics made easy
Freeman: How to read a paper: the basis of evidence based medicine

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Presentation of a scientific poster on a topic related to antimicrobials

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: A0 size poster
Percentage weighting in module: 30%

Write an SMI and COSHH assessment for a clinical laboratory

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: Completion of relevant templates

Oral presentation

Type of assessment: Oral presentation
Duration: 30 minutes
Percentage weighting in module: 40%

 

Module convener:           

Michele Branscombe, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The overall aim of this module, building on the Research Methods module is for the student to undertake research that shows originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret new information in a specialism of healthcare science.

The student will undertake an original piece of research involving the application of scientific investigation to one or more clinical situations.


Aims of the module.

The module aims to provide:

  • An understanding of ethical issues with regards to clinical research.
  • An introduction to grant proposal writing.
  • Experience of practical scientific research.
  • Develop organisational skills such as time management and record keeping.
  • Experience of presenting scientific research as a written document and at a seminar

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will have a knowledge and understanding of:

  • The critical evaluation of the scientific and ethical principles underpinning research.
  • understand the scientific basis and techniques required to add to current knowledge in a chosen area of Infection Sciences
  • At the end of this module students will have intellectual skills which will enable them to:
  • Critically evaluate the principles and practice of evidence based medicine.
  • Explain the use and limitations of reference manager systems.
  • Appraise the process leading to publication of a research paper.
  • Demonstrate the importance of multidisciplinary working in the design, delivery and optimisation of improved laboratory medicine services

At the end of this module students will have the following transferable skills and will be able to:

  • Explain and critically evaluate individual research publications according to evidence based medicine criteria
  • Critically evaluate, analyse and summarise current research and advanced scholarship in the specialism and draw justified conclusions from the evidence.
  • Recognise the importance of innovation in healthcare science
  • Develop and propose a hypothesis.
  • Critically evaluate and draw conclusions about the quality of relevant research publications.
  • Communicate knowledge or arguments from the research project both orally and in writing including presentation at a workplace based meeting
  • Contribute to and take an active part in the performance of a clinical audit that involves completion of the audit cycle

At the end of this module students will have the following practical skills and will be able to:

  • Undertake a research project to test the hypothesis from conception to completion
  • Confirm the necessary ethical, audit and/or Research and Development (R&D) approval
  • Assemble a body of data and analyse the data using appropriate statistical techniques
  • Prepare a written project report that analyses the findings and identifies strengths and weaknesses of the research project.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.


Dytham: Choosing and using statistics: A biologists guide Wiley-Blackwell 2010

Harris and Tatlor: Medical and health statistics made easy Jones and Bartlett 2009

Bjorn: How to Write and Illustrate a Scientific Paper Camnbridge Press 2010

Katz: From research to manuscript: A guide to Scientific Writing Springer 2009

Greenhaugh: How to read a paper: the basis of evidence based medicine Wiley Blackwell 2011

Evans: et al: Testing Treatments, better research for better healthcare Printer and Martin 2011.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Project submission

Type of assessment: Dissertation
Duration: 10,000 words
Percentage weighting in module: 90%

Oral Presentation

Type of assessment: Coursework
Duration: 15 minutes
Percentage weighting in module: 10%

Module convener:         

Dr Albert Mifsud, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.        

This is a compulsory core module covering aspects of public health and communicable disease control. After an introduction to practical epidemiology with special reference to clinical microbiology and infectious disease in the community, the module focuses on the relationship between the NHS, HPA, environmental health services and other relevant bodies in the UK.  The module also explores the worldwide public health issues which have implications for public health in the UK. The microbiology and legal aspects of food and water borne infections are also included within this module.

The module aims to provide:

  • An introduction to epidemiology including study design
  • An overview of the role of the clinical microbiology laboratory and the clinical microbiologist in the control of communicable disease within the UK including an understanding of the other agencies in the UK (e.g. NHS, HPA, environmental health services and councils) and the interaction required between clinical microbiology and these agencies for continued good public health.
  • An introduction to the principles of outbreak investigation and control including look back.
  • An understanding of the role of the microbiology laboratory in the quality assurance of food and water in the UK and the current legislation and guidelines on microbiological testing of food and water.
  • An awareness of worldwide infectious disease and implications for public health and communicable disease control in the UK in relation to visitors to the UK and UK residents travelling overseas
  • An overview of the role of vaccination in communicable disease control within the UK.
  • An understanding of the threat of bioterrorism in the UK, possible agents and the role of the clinical microbiology in control of such an event.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Design an epidemiological survey including a patient questionnaire.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the roles of the other agencies in the UK (e.g. NHS, HPA, environmental health services and councils) in communicable disease control. Students should be able to identify their role within communicable disease control and be able to interact professionally with other agencies.
  • Recognise an outbreak situation, establish relevant investigations and control procedures. Students will be able to communicate effectively with journalists to enable accurate and relevant information about an outbreak and control procedures to be relayed to the public. Students will be able to complete a look back exercise.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the microbiology laboratory in the quality assurance of food and water in the UK and the current legislation and guidelines on microbiological testing of food and water.
  • Locate up to date, relevant information about infectious diseases overseas from appropriate sources including HPA, CCDC and WHO. Explain the use of vaccination and prophylaxis for travellers from the UK. Demonstrate an understanding of specialist public health issues of immigrants to the UK.
  • Explain the current UK routine vaccination schedule and to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of current vaccinations.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the threat of bioterrorism in the UK, possible agents and the role of the clinical microbiology in control of such an event.

CORE READING

Students are expected to develop a strong basic background from text books but this must be supplemented by research in current scientific literature.

Suggested background texts include:
Webber: Communicable Disease, epidemiology and Control
or
Hawker et al: Communicable Disease Control Handbook

Roberts and Greenwood: Practical Food Microbiology

Suggested journals include:
Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Public Health Information

To develop your skills communicating with patients and the general public you will be asked to produce either a press release or a patient information leaflet about a selected topic in public health. This is a formative MCQ assessment.

End of module written assessment

This is an end of module exam paper taken at the end of the module.
Duration: 2 hours
Percentage weighting in module: 100%

Module lead: Mr Peter Roderick
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This is a compulsory module for the MSc, global health, law and governance, and an elective module for the MSc global public health and policy, MSc international primary health care, and MSc health systems and global policy.

It is intended to introduce students to some of the key international legal instruments and organisations that influence public health standards and policies.

This module will provide an introduction to international processes and legal regimes which are leading to global standard-setting and influence over national public health policies. Our focus will be on pharmaceuticals and international legal instruments across human rights, trade, and environmental sectors that are particularly relevant for public health. We will critically examine the powers, instruments, and policies of the World Health Organization and the World Trade Organization with respect to tobacco control, health services liberalisation, and harmonisation of pharmaceutical standards. We will also examine key international conventions and protocols concerning climate change, air pollution, and human rights.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

• Understand critically the institutions of global public health standard setting.
• Understand critically of the legal instruments of services trade liberalisation, tobacco control, climate change, and air pollution.
• Develop a knowledge of standard setting processes in a range of international public health standards
• Analyse international standard setting processes from democratic and legal perspectives
• Critically appraise the public health effects of specific international conventions and protocols
• Synthesise findings with respect to commonly accepted public health standards

CORE READING

Key texts
• World Health Organization, World Trade Organization (2002). WTO agreements and public health: a joint study by the WHO and the WTO secretariat. Geneva: WHO/WTO.
• Lee K, Buse KJ, Fustukian S (eds) (2002) Health policy in a globalising world. London: Cambridge University Press.
• Mossialos E, Mrazek M, Walley T. (eds) (2004) Regulating pharmaceuticals in Europe: striving for efficiency, equity and quality. Buckingham: Open University Press.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

(i) presentation, 10 minutes (20%); (ii) essay-style tutor marked assignment, 3,000 words (80%)

Module convener:        

Michele Branscombe, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

This module requires the student to undertake an original piece of research involving the application of scientific investigation to an area relevant to clinical microbiology. The investigation can be laboratory based or can be patient care focused (e.g. an audit).

Fulltime students usually complete their project within BICMS or the NHS at Barts and the London. Part time students complete their project at their sponsoring institution.

Before any student commences their project, they complete a project proposal with their supervisor in the style of a grant application and include with this document a timeline for the research. The student is also expected to have a formal review of progress with the supervisor halfway through the project. Copies of the project proposal and the formal review are given to the module organiser.
The module organiser regularly liaises with the project supervisors of all students, especially the part time students who are completing the project under the supervision of their home institution.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

The module aims to provide:

  • An understanding of ethical issues with regards to clinical research.
  • An introduction to grant proposal writing.
  • Experience of practical scientific research.
  • Develop organisational skills such as time management and record keeping.
  • Experience of presenting scientific research as a written document and at a seminar.

 At the end of this module students will be able to:

  • Understand when ethical approval for research is required and be able to obtain ethical approval for a project if required.
  • Write a simple grant proposal in collaboration with their project supervisor. This is presented to the course organisers before the project can commence.
  • Work independently and as part of a research team to complete a piece of original scientific research.
  • Provide a laboratory notebook or the data required for an audit in an organised manner to enable checking of data presented in the dissertation.
  • Present the final dissertation as a piece of scientific literature, following the style of a journal article. The content should be an accurate representation of data discovered and should include interpretation of the results obtained. Scientific referencing should be used throughout the written dissertation.

CORE READING

See reading list for Clinical Microbiology Research and Presentation Skills module

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Dissertation

Duration: 7000-8000 words
Percentage weighting in module: 100%
 

Module Leads:

Prof. Karim BrohiThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Prof. Susan BrundageThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This module will provide a general introduction to research methods in medical science.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Learn about problems associated to research design
  • Learn a range of relevant research skills (design, conduce and frame research projects) in the discipline of medical science
  • Learn generic research training in quantitative and qualitative methods.

Module Leads:

Dr K Akhtar, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mr P Bates, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This module will cover the pathophysiology of spine, nerve and spinal Cord injury.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • To critically evaluate the principles of diagnosis and treatment for patients with spine, nerve and spinal cord injuries.
  • Describe the mechanisms and dysfunction inherent to spinal cord and nerve injuries and
  • Outline the key elements of their management.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Summative assessments occur weekly, and for each module will comprise of:

  • Multiple choice questions (MCQ) – Percentage weighting 20%
  • Written assignment of 1500 words (+-10%) – Percentage weighting 80% - minimum pass mark of 50%

Module co-ordinators:

Dr Nick Croft, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr David Bulmer, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

You will study:

The scientific basis of GI diseases (clinical anatomy, embryology, physiology, histology, microbiology). 

Applied immunology, cell biology, molecular biology relevant to the GI tract.

Human genetics and its application to GI diseases.

Principles of investigating GI diseases: advantages, disadvantages and applications including radiological, nuclear medicine, endoscopy, physiological, pH studies, impedance and breath tests.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Explain the basic principles and practicalities of research in patients, including designing and running of a clinical trial.
  • Determine the evidence base for a clinical problem (e.g. a treatment). 
  • Find, review, assess and present clinical and scientific research papers.

ASSESSMENT

One examination lasting 1.5 or 2 hours. This module exam is worth 60% of the mark for the module, with the remaining 40% constituted by coursework, which will be set at the start of the module. The coursework assignment [essay] will have a maximum of 2000 words, or an oral presentation or a poster presentation to the examiner.

Dept. responsible. School of Engineering and Material Sciences (SEMS), QMUL

Course organiser.

Dr K. Hing, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

To develop an understanding of the concept that chemistry, structure and mechanics combine to contribute to a materials success or failure in clinical applications.   Developing the ability to strategically evaluate what comprises biocompatibility and the most appropriate techniques for its assessment is essential in this field.

Topics include: This module will provide a comprehensive understanding of the concepts related to biocompatibility. It will cover topics including proteins and protein adsorption, cells and tissue interactions (attachment, fluid shear and mechanotransduction), biomaterial blood and cell interactions, inflammation, wound healing and foreign body response and toxicity, hypersensitivity and infection.

The In-vitro testing of biomaterials will be considered with respect to 
– chemical exchange and degradation 
– cell response (proliferation vs differentiation)
– evaluation of material compatibility
– evaluation of device functionality (biomechanics, remodelling/adaptation)
Matters related to clinical trials and regulatory approval will be considered including clean manufacturing, microbiology, packaging and sterility assurance.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

Impart a knowledge and understanding of:

1. The concept that biocompatibility is application dependent

2. The range and complexity of biological responses to a material/device/restoration

3. The range of effects that the physiological environment can have on material/device/restoration functionality

4. The methods used to assess biocompatibility and associated ethics

Promotion of intellectual skills to:

1. Appreciate the wide range of material characteristics and host interactions/responses that control biocompatibility

2. Identify which materials properties are critical to biocompatibility in a given application

3. Recognise the limitations of measurement and experimental techniques used in the study of biocompatibility

Facilitate transferable skills able to:

1. Communicate knowledge and ideas verbally and in written reports using a vocabulary of biomedical terms.

2. Recognise, analyse and solve problems individually and in groups

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Examination 100% (one 2.5hr examination)

Module leads:

Prof. Karim Brohi, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Prof. Susan BrundageThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This module will analyse aspects of torso trauma and the effect that different mechanisms have on torso injuries.

KEY LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • Discuss the initial evaluation of the torso injured patients, with specific attention to blunt and penetrating injuries. Treatment options - operative and non-operative
  • Critically analyse organ and system specific injuries and their operative and non- operative treatment.
  • Learn the tools to recognise different types of injuries and initiate treatment for patients with torso trauma.
  • Identify and use correctly the diagnostic tools in the assessment of torso trauma.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Summative assessments occur weekly, and for each module will comprise of:

  •  Multiple choice questions (MCQ) – Percentage weighting 20%
  •  Written assignment of 1500 words (+-10%) – Percentage weighting 80% - minimum pass mark of 50%

Module Leads:

Dr Elaine Cole

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

This elective module will provide an overview of the trauma nurses role.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Consider what is meant by the title ‘trauma nurse’ – identifying the breadth of clinical and non-clinical roles
  • Evaluate the care of trauma patients in a critical care setting
  • Identify specific system or age related needs of trauma patients
  • Critically evaluate a trauma patient case report

Module Leads:

Dr K Akhtar, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mr P Bates, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This module will analyse aspects of torso trauma and the effect that different mechanisms have on torso injuries.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Discuss the initial evaluation of the torso injured patients, with specific attention to blunt and penetrating injuries. Treatment options - operative and non-operative
  • Critically analyse organ and system specific injuries and their operative and non- operative treatment.
  • Learn the tools to recognise different types of injuries and initiate treatment for patients with torso trauma.
  • Identify and use correctly the diagnostic tools in the assessment of torso trauma.

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Summative assessments occur weekly, and for each module will comprise of:

  • Multiple choice questions (MCQ) – Percentage weighting 20%
  • Written assignment of 1500 words (+-10%) – Percentage weighting 80% - minimum pass mark of 50%

Module Leads: 

Prof K BrohiThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Prof S I BrundageThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

This module will develop advanced and critical knowledge of the principles and theory of trauma, from triage and pre-hospital care to injury prevention.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • To analyse different trauma scoring systems
  • To learn the skills to analyse the history and evolution of trauma

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Summative assessments occur weekly, and for each module will comprise of:

  • Multiple choice questions (MCQ) - Percentage weighting 20%
  • Written assignment of 1500 words (+-10%) - Percentage weighting 80% - minimum pass mark of 50%

 

 

 

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Level: First year undergraduate (level 4)

Semester: A

Course credits: 15 ECTS

Course coordinator:

Dr. Tim Huijts
Lecturer in Global Public Health
Centre for Primary Care and Public Health
Blizard Institute
Queen Mary University of London
Yvonne Carter Building, Room 1.09
58 Turner Street, E1 2AB London
Phone: (020) 7882 2497
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course content

People’s health worldwide is strongly influenced by policies at the local, national, and international level. Politics has a central role in shaping these policies. This course provides an introduction into the role of politics in global health. The course demonstrates the importance and relevance of politics in affecting people’s health. We describe the role of the different actors in politics, and discuss the main mechanisms linking these actors to global health. Moreover, we explain why politics has a crucial impact on global health. To do so, we use insights from political theory and political philosophy. As such, this course also provides a general introduction to political theory and political philosophy.

Five key themes are used to show the strong link between politics and global health, applying basic political theory and philosophy: healthcare systems, social policy, health related behaviour, citizenship and democracy, and foreign aid. Focusing on these themes, we demonstrate that basic principles on actors, mechanisms, and key concepts and theories can be applied to a broad range of domains in the field of global health. Also, it will be clear that the main arguments from political theory and philosophy are at the root of the politics of global health. For each of the key themes, we focus on a number of selected characteristic cases from across the globe.

Learning aims

By the end of the course students will be able to:

  • Identify the key actors linking politics to global health
  • Describe and explain the main mechanisms through which politics influences global health
  • Reproduce and explain key concepts and theories relevant for global health from political theory and political philosophy
  • Apply key concepts and theories from political theory and political philosophy to recent, specific cases in global health
  • Critically evaluate arguments from political theory and philosophy
  • Write and present clearly, concisely, and critically on the application of the knowledge obtained during the course to recent, specific cases in global health

Relation to other BSc Global Health courses

  • Whereas other courses focus on a variety of other determinants of global health (e.g., geographical or social determinants), this course focuses on political determinants of health.
  • This course offers an introduction to specialized courses on the role of politics in global health (e.g., the Semester B course on International politics and global health: an introduction). Basic knowledge and skills obtained in the current course will be further developed in these specialized courses.
  • The course offers a first case-based introduction to main subjects from later courses in the BSc Global Health programme (e.g., healthcare systems)
  • The course distinguishes itself from other courses in the BSc Global Health programme by also serving as a general introduction to political theory, political philosophy, and critical thinking.

Main course readings

The following list of readings will be used as the main course literature. For each week, the week-by-week programme shows which readings will be discussed. Students are expected to read these readings in advance of the lectures. Furthermore, short additional readings are assigned for some of the seminar meetings. These are also shown in the week-by-week programme.

-A. Vincent. Modern Political Ideologies, 3rd Edition (Wiley Blackwell, 2010).

-B. Goodwin. Using Political Ideas, 6th Edition (Wiley, 2014).

-D. Marsh and G. Stoker. Theories and Methods in Political Science, 3rd Edition (Palgrave, 2010), esp. Part I.

-M. Blake (2001). ‘Distributive Justice, State Coercion, and Autonomy’, Philosophy and Public Affairs, 30, 257-296.

-J. Rawls. Justice as Fairness: A Restatement (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2001), esp. Parts I and II.

-A. Sen. Development as Freedom (Oxford University Press, 1999).

-M. Sandel. Liberalism and the Limits of Justice, 2nd Edition (Cambridge University Press, 1998).

-R. Nozick. Anarchy, State, and Utopia (Basic Books, 1974), esp. Chapters 7 and 8.

COURSE ORGANISATION

Class meetings

Every week, there are two class meetings: one one-hour lecture and one two-hour seminar. All lectures are on Wednesdays from 9:00am to 10:00am, and all seminars are on Wednesdays from 10:30am to 12:30pm. During the lectures, the course material will be presented and discussed by dr. Tim Huijts. There will also be room for questions during the lectures, and students will be asked to engage actively with the lectures by answering questions from the lecturer. The seminars will focus on answering, discussing, and debating questions and assignments that are based on the lectures, the main course readings, and additional literature. Students will be actively involved in the seminars by chairing and participating in debates, giving short presentations, and discussing the seminar questions and assignments in the group.

WEEK BY WEEK PROGRAMME

This is an example for prospective students - course structure subject to change

Week 1: Introduction: politics and global health

Theme:

The course starts with a section on basic political theory and philosophy. In the first week, we give a general introduction to the issue of politics and global health. We show why politics is crucial for people’s health worldwide, and why knowledge of the link between politics and global health is essential for understanding and studying global health. We list the main actors in politics and global health: politicians, commercial firms, lobby groups, policy makers, but also the general population. We discuss the three main mechanisms linking politics and global health: incentives, ideologies, and interests. Our key argument is that all main actors have incentives, ideologies, and interests, and that the interplay between these factors strongly influences global health. Finally, we argue that political theory and political philosophy are highly relevant to help our understanding of why politics have a strong impact on global health, and of the deeper underlying background of the incentives, ideologies, and interests. This forms the prelude to weeks 2, 3, and 4, when basic theories and concepts from political theory and philosophy will be explained in more detail. In the first seminar, we will also briefly pay attention to the course organisation and the planning of the essay deadlines and presentations.

Seminar questions:

-Questions for discussion in Goodwin (p. 17 and p. 35).

-Find information (e.g., a newspaper article, a blog, etc.) about a recent political decision or event that has (or will have) an impact on health, and bring it to the seminar. For this political decision or event, determine (a) who are the actors involved?; (b) how does the political decision or event influence health, and (c) what are the incentives, ideologies, and interests of the main actors?

Readings:

-B. Goodwin. Using Political Ideas, 6th Edition (Wiley, 2014), Chapters 1 and 2 (pp. 3-38).

Additional readings:

None

Week 2: Political theory

Theme:

Why do politicians make the decisions they do? How are their decisions influenced by policy makers, lobby groups, and the general population? How does the public debate find its way into the political debate? And to what extent does public opinion actually influence politics? These are all questions that political theory aims to answer. Political theory is focused on understanding the role of politics in society, and on the roles of the main actors in the political process. As such, political theory helps us to understand the importance of politics, and the deeper underlying background of the incentives, ideologies, and interests that shape the behaviour and attitudes of these main actors. However, rather than one undisputed political theory, there are multiple contested political theories. This week, we discuss the five main approaches in political theory: behaviouralism, rational choice, institutionalism, constructivism, and political psychology. We compare the approaches to find similarities and differences, and we use the five main approaches to explain the behaviour and attitudes of the main actors in the political process. Importantly, we also note that politicians are often adherents to certain strands of political theory, and make decisions based on scientifically informed views of human behaviour. Also, political ideologies and political theory often reinforce each other, and political science is regularly used to legitimize ideologically motivated policy. Before discussing the main political ideologies, it is therefore important to learn more about different approaches to political theory, and to realize that none of them is uncontested.

Seminar questions:

-Why do politicians sometimes make decisions that are harmful for the people who voted for them? Use each of the five main theoretical approaches to give five separate answers to this question.

-Are politicians able to make decisions that are beneficial to all citizens of their countries? And if so, how will they know which decisions are beneficial to everyone?

Readings:

-D. Marsh and G. Stoker. Theories and Methods in Political Science, 3rd Edition (Palgrave, 2010), Introduction and Chapters 1 to 5 (pp. 1-113).  

Additional readings:

None

Week 3: Ideologies

Theme:

Whereas interests and incentives can often be influenced and shaped through policy, ideologies are less malleable. Nonetheless, ideologies have a profound impact on global health by shaping attitudes, perceptions, and expectations among all actors in the political process. In this week, we discuss several of the main political ideologies of the 19th, 20th, and 21st century (e.g., liberalism, socialism, and conservatism). We go back to classic political theory and philosophy to reveal the roots of these ideologies, using main arguments by e.g. Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Mill. Importantly, we also show how contemporary politicians as well as the general population are influenced by these classic main arguments, which demonstrates the importance of studying political theory and philosophy (including the classics) to arrive at a solid understanding of the importance of politics.

Seminar questions:

-Questions for discussion in Goodwin (p. 71, p. 106, p. 131, p. 159, and p.182).

-To what extent should free healthcare be available to everyone? Debate this question using the political ideologies described in this week’s readings.

Readings:

-B. Goodwin. Using Political Ideas, 6th Edition (Wiley, 2014), Chapters 3 to 7 (pp. 39-182).

-A. Vincent. Modern Political Ideologies, 3rd Edition (Wiley Blackwell, 2010), Chapters 1 to 5 (pp. 1-135).

Additional readings:

None

Week 4: Key ideas and concepts

Theme:

In the public, political, and scientific debate about global health, several key ideas and concepts occur almost automatically. However, based on their ideological profile, interests, and incentives, people have very different understandings about the exact meaning and importance of these key ideas and concepts. This week, we will discuss a variety of key ideas and concepts from political theory and philosophy (e.g., democracy, freedom, equality, responsibility, justice, and citizenship). We will examine the different definitions of these key ideas and concepts, and investigate to what extent these definitions are based on ideologies and interests. As we will show, different definitions of these key often date back to old disputes in classic political theory and philosophy, but still have an impact on the political process and the public discourse.

Seminar questions:

-Questions for discussion in Goodwin (p. 340, p. 359, p. 387, p. 414, p. 441).

-How would you define ‘freedom’, ‘equality’, and ‘justice’?

-Define these three words from a (a) liberal perspective, (b) social democratic perspective, and (c) conservative perspective, based on the lecture and readings from Week 3.

-To what extent are people’s definitions of these three words driven by their interests?

Readings:

-B. Goodwin. Using Political Ideas, 6th Edition (Wiley, 2014), Chapters 12 to 16 (pp. 305-442).

Additional readings:

None

Week 5: Healthcare systems

Theme:

After discussing basic political theory and philosophy in the first four weeks, the fifth week is the first in a series of five that applies the mechanisms, political theory, ideologies, and key ideas and concepts to five key themes in the politics of global health. As such, the second section of this course links general political theory and philosophy to the actual politics of global health. We start by focusing on healthcare systems. We focus on the importance of the definition of responsibility in designing healthcare systems. Who is responsible for providing healthcare: the state, the individual, or society as a whole? We contrast recent trends in several countries towards less state responsibility (e.g., the UK and the Netherlands) with trends towards more state responsibility (e.g., the USA), and try to explain these trends by looking at underlying ideologies, incentives, and interests of the actors involved. Finally, we pay attention to the role of feminism in healthcare systems. As we will argue, feminism has had a strong impact on the development of healthcare systems in several countries. Additionally, we use feminism as a basis to evaluate the consequences of less state responsibility in providing healthcare.

Seminar questions:

-Questions for discussion in Goodwin (p. 252).

-Based on the additional readings, to what extent can ‘Big Society’ replace state responsibility for healthcare provision?

-Why did David Cameron call for ‘Big Society’? Reflect on the role of the ideologies and interests of him and the Conservative party.

-Use feminism, liberalism, socialism, and conservatism to argue to what extent and why informal homecare (by friends, family, neighbourds, etc.) would be a good alternative to state-based institutionalized healthcare.

Readings:

-B. Goodwin. Using Political Ideas, 6th Edition (Wiley, 2014), Chapter 9 (pp. 217-253).

-A. Vincent. Modern Political Ideologies, 3rd Edition (Wiley Blackwell, 2010), Chapter 7 (pp. 165-197).

Additional readings:

-A. Pollock and D. Price (2011). ‘The abolition of the NHS. That’s what is happening’, Open Democracy, http://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/allyson-pollock-david-price/abolition-of-nhs-that%E2%80%99s-what-is-happening-0

-B. Ashton (2010). ‘Big Society. Political philosophy and implications for health policy’, The King’s Fund, http://www.kingsfund.org.uk/sites/files/kf/field/field_document/big-society-health-care-beccy-ashton-oct2010.pdf

Week 6: Social policy

Theme:

Global health is not only strongly influenced by healthcare systems, but also by social policy, such as policy on employment protection, unemployment benefits, and income redistribution. This week, we will demonstrate that the strong variation in social policy between countries is to a great deal due to differences in ideologies, interests, and incentives among the main actors involved in the political process. We will particularly focus on the concepts of equality and entitlement. To what extent can social inequalities in health be reduced by government intervention? And if they can be reduced, should governments in fact aim to do so? Is everyone entitled to social policy measures, or should some individuals or social groups be excluded, or rather privileged? As we will show, the answers to these questions relate to the more general issue of the unintended incentives that employment and income policy may generate, and to the issue of the state’s responsibility for the well-being of its inhabitants.

Seminar questions:

-Examine the distinction between inequality and inequity made by Kawachi et al. To what extent are governments able to reduce inequality, and to what extent can they diminish inequity?

-Navarro et al. suggest that health outcomes are best in countries with social democratic governments. Describe through which mechanisms social democratic governments would improve health outcomes.

-From Navarro et al.’s paper, can we conclude that global health is best off with social democratic governments? Give at least two criticisms to this claim.

-To what extent is it in the interest of privileged social groups to promote high expenditure on healthcare and social policy for vulnerable social groups? And to what extent is it in the interest of vulnerable social groups to promote free access to healthcare and entitlement to social benefits for privileged social groups.  

Readings:

-R. Nozick. Anarchy, State, and Utopia (Basic Books, 1974), Chapters 7 and 8.

Additional readings:

-I. Kawachi, S.V. Subramanian, and N. Almeida-Filho (2002). ‘A glossary for health inequalities’, Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 56, 647-652.

-V. Navarro et al. (2006). ‘Politics and health outcomes’, Lancet, 368, 1033-1037.

Week 7: Reading week

Theme:

There are no lecture and seminar for this course during the reading week. However, the reading week is not a vacation week, and students are expected to complete outstanding coursework, to revise the readings, and to work on their essay.

Week 8: Health related behaviour

Theme:

Epidemiological studies have provided ample evidence that health related behaviour is among the most central determinants of people’s health. Especially smoking, alcohol consumption, poor nutrition, and lack of physical activity are responsible for a considerable loss of duration and quality of people’s lives. However, despite the fact that several policies appear to be succesful in reducing health damaging behaviour (e.g., smoking bans), in many countries politicians’ efforts to limit health damaging behaviour have been limited. This week, we will explain why many countries have only limited policies on health related behaviour by examining the role of ideologies, incentives, and interests of the actors involved in the political process around policy on health damaging behaviour. The concept of freedom is crucial here: to what extent are individuals free to decide on their own health related behaviour? We discuss the work of key scholars from political philosophy (i.e., Rawls, Sandel, and Sen), to see how the concept of freedom has developed in recent decades, compared to classic definitions of freedom as articulated by e.g. Smith and Mill (discussed in Week 3 and Week 4). As these works demonstrate, it is not evident that people’s right to decide their own health related behaviour can be disconnected from moral values.

Seminar questions:

-Debate whether people (a) are free to decide whether they smoke, and (b) if they should be free to decide whether they smoke. Use arguments from classic liberalism, Rawls, Sen, and Sandel.

-It has been suggested that governments could also promote health enhancing behaviour through nudging (for a description of nudging, see e.g. Ashton (2010), one of the additional readings for Week 5). To what extent would nudging by the state impinge on individuals’ freedom?

-The editorial in the Lancet suggests that there have been relatively few and weak tobacco control policies because of a lack of political will. Do you think this lack of political will is a consequence of ideology or of interests?

Readings:

-J. Rawls. Justice as Fairness: A Restatement (Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2001), Parts I and II.

-A. Sen. Development as Freedom (Oxford University Press, 1999), Introduction and Chapter 1 (pp. 3-34).

-M. Sandel. Liberalism and the Limits of Justice, 2nd Edition (Cambridge University Press, 1998).

Additional readings:

-Editorial (2013). ‘Tobacco control – political will needed’, Lancet, 381, 1511.

Week 9: Citizenship and democracy

Theme:

This week, we examine the impact of the legal and political system on health. Even in countries with universal access to healthcare and social policy, some social groups may be excluded from these services and benefits. The most important ground for exclusion is based on citizenship. In several countries, migrants’ rights to healthcare are contested. We examine the role of identity and solidarity in shaping global health, and investigate nationalism to explain why some groups are excluded from access to healthcare and social benefits. Also, we discuss to what extent it is in the native population’s and politicians’ interest to exclude migrant groups from access to healthcare. In addition to an examination of citizenship, this week also includes a comparison between democracies and totalitarian regimes. We examine to what extent democracy promotes freedom and equality. To what extent are people healthier in democratic countries? Studies on European countries are contrasted with recent evidence from the Middle East.

Seminar questions:

-Questions for discussion in Goodwin (p. 215 and p. 302).

-When should migrants get the right to have equal access to the healthcare system as other citizens? Answer this question based on conservative ideology, Sandel’s arguments, Rawls’ arguments, and classic liberal ideology.

-Based on his article, how would Blake evaluate the change in Spain’s health system?

-To what extent is the change in Spain’s health system driven by ideology?

Readings:

-B. Goodwin. Using Political Ideas, 6th Edition (Wiley, 2014), Chapter 8 (pp. 183-216) and Chapter 11 (pp. 281-304).

-A. Vincent. Modern Political Ideologies, 3rd Edition (Wiley Blackwell, 2010), Chapter 6 (pp. 136-164) and Chapter 9 (pp. 226-260).

-M. Blake (2001). ‘Distributive Justice, State Coercion, and Autonomy’, Philosophy and Public Affairs, 30, 257-296.

Additional readings:

-A. Garcia Rada (2012). ‘New legislation transforms Spain’s health system from universal access to one based on employment’, BMJ, 344:e3196 doi: 10.1136/bmj.e3196.

Week 10: Foreign aid

Theme:

Most governments do not only invest in the health of their own citizens, but also in the health of people in other countries. This is mostly done by supporting foreign aid programmes. It may seem puzzling that governments do not promote health of migrants in their country whilst simultaneously supporting people in other countries. This week, we examine the role of politics on foreign aid. We will focus again on the concepts of responsibility and entitlement, and on the role of agency. Based on the work of Sen and Banerjee and Duflo, we argue why foreign aid programmes may not always be helpful, again using explanations around incentives, interests, and ideologies. Also, we use the example of foreign aid to show the limitations of examining the politics of global health at the national level. This theme will be used as a stepping stone towards the course on International politics and global health in Semester B, where an international and more relational approach to politics will be used.

Seminar questions:

-What reasons can politicians have to invest in the health and well-being of people in other countries? Consider the ideologies discussed in Week 3, and the role of interests.

-Why is foreign aid not always succesful? Use this week’s readings and additional readings to identify conditions under which foreign aid may be succesfull, and describe the role of interests, incentives, and ideologies in creating these conditions.

Readings:

-A. Sen. Development as Freedom (Oxford University Press, 1999), Chapter 2, Chapter 4, Chapter 7, and Chapter 9.

Additional readings:

-A.V. Banerjee and E. Duflo. Poor Economics (Public Affairs, 2011), Chapter 1.

Week 11: Summary and conclusion

Theme:

In the third and final section of the course, we formulate conclusions. First, a summary of the course will be given. We look back at the five key themes, and see to what extent overarching conclusions can be drawn from these five themes. In doing so, we also examine what the examples from the five key themes have taught us about the role of the actors in the politics of global health, about political theory and philosophy, and about the impact of political ideologies, interests, and incentives. We discuss an overview of the ways through which political theory and philosophy have an impact on the politics of global health, and therefore also on global health as such. We also give a short preview of the Semester B course on International politics and global health, to show how this course builds on and adds to the current course. Finally, we raise some ethical issues in politics and global health, for politicians, policy makers, and health professionals, but also for scientists. E.g., to what extent do scientists have the potential to inform political debates on global health, and to what extent is it their responsibility to do so?

Seminar questions:

Students are asked to prepare their own questions about the readings and the lectures. The answers to their questions will be discussed during the seminar. Also, students will get the opportunity to answer and discuss example exam questions. As such, the final seminar is intended to revise the course material, solve outstanding problems and clarifications, and to prepare for the written exam.

Readings:

None

Additional readings:

None

Week 12: Exam

Theme:

There are no lecture and seminar for this course in Week 12. Instead, the students will take a written exam.

Centres: Centre for Primary Care and Public Health.

Research Groups: Women’s Health Research Unit.

Full title: Evidence-based Medicine Collaboration Network for guideline development, teaching and dissemination

Acronym: EBM Connect

Overview

EBM CONNECT is funded by the Marie Curie International Research Staff Exchange Scheme (IRSES). It aims to harness the combined research expertise of several centres in evidence-based medicine or EBM. We focus on development of state-of-the-art methodology for systematic reviews and practice guidelines in maternal health. These contribute towards improving research synthesis skills throughout the European Union and the developing world and towards promoting effective healthcare through research based practice and policy.  Not only does the centres benefit from staff exchange to develop their own skills, this project advances the frontiers in research synthesis.  It creates the ability to conduct multinational projects and establish an electronic platform for research communication and collaboration. By establishing a worldwide agenda and a critical mass through the exchange, it generates momentum that will allow development to continue. This is vital with reference to improving maternal health, as this is an area where disparity exists not only worldwide but also between EU member states.

The exchange scheme is based around three main objectives. First, it increases research skills through the sharing of each participant’s expertise. Second, it develops new methods for searching, quality assessment and meta-analysis to improve the standard of reviews and guidelines produced. This includes appraisal and adaptation of these reviews and guidelines to ensure they can be utilised widely within and outside the EU, including translation into Chinese and Spanish.  Third, it establishes a cutting edge research seminar series for widespread dissemination of the work.   

We have well-established and internationally recognised generic expertise in evidence synthesis in maternal health, with highly qualified specialists in individual centres. We also have previous experience of multinational cooperation in researching and advancing evidence-based medicine research through multicentre cooperative studies and projects (WHO-RHL, EU-EBM consortium  (www.ebm-unity.org)  (Leonardo da Vinci Programme), SUPPORT (EU FP6)). We seek to hone and broaden research synthesis skills through effective staff exchange and to broaden the scope of this work to facilitate our ultimate goal of influencing policy making in maternal health.

STAFF

Shakila Thangaratinam

Khalid Khan

Anushka Tirlapur

WORKSHOPS

  1. Systematic review workshops (Shanghai, March 2011)
  2. GRADE workshops (Argentina, December 2010, 2011, April 2012)
  3. Statistics for systematic reviews (Argentina, 2011)
  4. 1st Katherine Twining research meeting (London, June 2011)
  5. 2nd Katherine Twining research meeting (QMUL, June 2012)
  6. Research methodology in maternal health (Amsterdam, September 2012)
  7. Research methodology workshops (Argentina 2010, 2011, 2012)
  8. Pre-term birth collaborative meeting (QMUL, July 2013)
  9. Systematic review writing workshop (Argentina, January 2014)

PUBLICATIONS

  1. Chen Q-J, HouS-P, MeadsC,Huang Y-M, HongQ-Q, ZhuH-P, ChengL-N and EBM-Connect. Mifepristone in combination with prostaglandins fortermination of 10-16 weeks' gestation: a systematic review. European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology 2011; 159:247-54.
  2. Khan KS, Borowiack E, Roos C, Kowalska M, Zapalska A, Mol BW, Mignini L, Meads C, Walczak J for the EBM-Connect Collaboration. Making GRADE accessible: a proposal for graphic display of evidence quality assessments. Evidence Based Medicine 2011; 16(3):65-69.
  3. Zhu Q-X, MD, Meads C, Lu M-L, Wu J-Q, Zhou W-J, Gao E-S. Turning Point for Semen Quality: A Population-based Study in Chinese Men. Fertility and Sterility 2011 Sep;96(3):572-6
  4. Kleinrouweler C, Wiegerinck M, Ris-Stalpers C, Bossuyt P, van der Post J, von Dadelszen P, Mol B, Pajkrt E; for the EBM Connect Collaboration. Accuracy of circulating placental growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 and soluble endoglin in the prediction of pre-eclampsia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2012 Jun;119(7):778-787
  5. E. Fox, S. A. Tirlapur, A. M Gülmezoglu, J.P. Souza MD, K. S. Khan and EBM-CONNECT Collaboration. Assimilating evidence quality at a glance using graphic display: Research synthesis on labor induction. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Aug;91(8):885-92.
  6. Breijer MC, van Doorn HC, Clark TJ, Khan KS, Timmermans A, Mol BW, Opmeer BC. Diagnostic strategies for endometrial cancer in women with postmenopausal bleeding: cost-effectiveness of individualized strategies. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2012
  7. Asuquo B, Vellore AD, walters G, Manney S, Mignini L, Kunst H. A case-control study of the risk of adverse perinatal outcomes due to tuberculosis during pregnancy. J Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 2012
  8. Garcia-Blazquez V, Vincente-Bartulos A, Olavarria-Delgado A, Plana MN, van der Winden D, Zamora J: EBM Connect collaboration. Accuracy of CT angiography in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Eur Radiol. 2013 May; 23(5):1181-90
  9. Li Y, Wu J, Yu J, Gao E, Meads C, Afnan M, Ren J, Rong F. The EBM Connect collaboration. Is fetal macrosomia related to blood pressure amongst adolescents? A birth cohort study in China (submitted to Journal of Human Hypertension). J Hum Hypertens. 2013 Apr 18
  10. Roos C, Borowiack E, Kowalska M, Zapalska A, Mol BW, Mignini L, Meads C, Walcak J, Khan KS for the EBM Connect Collaboration. What do we know about tocolytic effectiveness and how do we use this information in guidelines? A comparison of evidence grading. BJOG. 2013 Sep 10.
  11. Leung EY, Malick SM, Khan KS; the EBM-CONNECT Collaboration. On-the-Job Evidence-Based Medicine Training for Clinician-Scientists of the Next Generation.Clin Biochem Rev. 2013 Aug;34(2):93-103.

PARTNERS

Pathology can be described as the study of disease. To understand the disease state, it is essential to understand the normal processes of the body. This course offers learning in specific areas of pathology covering...

 

Geographies of Biomedicine and Global Health

GEG4401

Semester 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Reid-Henry
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces students to the study of human health and disease (conceived as both an individual, a community and a population attribute) from an historical and geographical perspective. It places particular emphasis on exploring the forms of geographical unevenness in contemporary global health and biomedicine and the social, political and economic processes that have shaped this. The module is divided into three parts, each of which familiarises students with current debates in global health and biomedicine and provides an introduction to core themes and ideas: Society, Culture and Health; Geographies of Global Health; and Geographies of Biomedicine. The course is thematically organized but introduces core case studies into each lecture.

  • Attendance Based
  • Full Time

Please follow this link to view our Course finder pages on the QMUL website. The Blizard Institute is situated within the Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary, University of London....

Underpinned by a commitment to principles of social justice and fairness, this intercalated BSc in global public health will provide students with a public health perspective on today's global challenges....

  • Full Time

The science of infectious disease and epidemiology is an interdisciplinary subject situated at the interface between medicine, molecular and cell biology and the social sciences. This fact is taken into account by...

Rating: 15 credits

Prerequisites: None (however, at the beginning of the course, all students will be invited to undergo a self-assessment math test in order to evaluate their ability to follow the mathematical concepts within the course. Extra support will be given to those who will not pass the test)

Lectures: 1 hour per week semester A

Seminars: 2 hours per week semester A

Assessment: short answer test (100%)  

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Module Aims and Outline:
This course is designed to be a highly interactive course aimed at introducing the students to the basic concepts of epidemiology and statistics. The course will mainly explore the theoretical issues underlying epidemiological research, however, practical skills will be thought in the module to reinforce the understanding of key concepts. During the course the students will firstly learn to interpret, apply and calculate measures of diseases and exposures in populations; then the core of the curse focuses on study design (including applications and specific sources of bias). As a result, by the end of the course, the students are able to critical appraise scientific epidemiological papers listing their strengths and limitations and identifying potential pitfalls in interpreting epidemiological data: chance, bias, confounding, and effect modification. Students are also introduced to the basic principle underlying causality assessment in epidemiology.

Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the course students will be able to:

  • Interpret, apply, and calculate measures of disease incidence and prevalence, and univariate measures of exposure-disease association (odds ratio, relative and absolute risk)
  • List potential source of epidemiological data on health status and health service utilisation and assess their strength and limitation
  • Understand the principles underlying the four main study designs (cross-sectional, case-control, cohort, and interventional) and apply the appropriate study design for a given scientific question
  • Critical appraise scientific epidemiological papers and list strengths and limitations of each of the four study designs
  • Identify and quantify potential pitfalls in interpreting epidemiological data: chance, bias, confounding, and effect modification
  • Enumerate principles for assessing causality in epidemiology
  • Extrapolate relevant figures from epidemiological studies for conveying a public health message, and critically evaluate analogous figures reported by the media

Reading:
Saracci R (2010). Epidemiology – A very short introduction. Oxford University Press, New York

Rothman KJ (2012). Epidemiology – An introduction. Oxford University Press, New York

Aschengrau A, Seage GR III (2014) Epidemiology in Public Health. Jones & Bartlett earning, Burlington

Carneiro I, Howard N (2005) Introduction to Epidemiology. Open University Press, Maidenhead

Porta M (2008) A dictionary of Epidemiology. Oxford University Press, New York

 

Level: First year undergraduate (level 4)

Semester: B

Course credits: 15 ECTS

Course coordinator:

Dr. Petra Sevcikova
Senior Researcher
Centre for Primary Care and Public Health
Blizard Institute
Queen Mary University of London
Yvonne Carter Building, Room 1.09
58 Turner Street, E1 2AB London
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course content

Economics is a core discipline of public health. Economic analysis is used to determine how to achieve efficiency and equity through the institutions of government and the market. It makes an important contribution to debates about the role of the state and the extent and means of redistribution in society. All governments accept some responsibility for the allocation of health care throughout society and none leaves allocation entirely to the market. This module is concerned with the theories behind and the mechanisms of government and market control in the health care system, and with the resource distributions that result.

This module will introduce core theories and concepts of economics and discuss their applications in health policy. The module will introduce theories of scarcity, demand, and need. It will describe the theories of the market, and discuss market theory in relation to the specific characteristics of health and health care. It will introduce students to market failure and the notion of public and private goods. We will also introduce the basic concepts and methods of economic evaluation that inform decisions about alternative resource allocations and priority setting at various levels in a health care system.

Learning aims

By the end of the course students will be able to:

  • Define and explore health care resource allocation mechanisms employed in different health systems
  • Explain the key economic concepts and theories used to analyse the behaviour of patients, doctors, and other providers of health care
  • Identify and critically appraise economics arguments commonly applied within health care policy-making
  • Examine the limits of economic analysis in health care policy making
  • Explain the rationale for the use of economic evaluation in health care and to have a critical understanding of the limitations of economic evaluation
  • Write clearly, concisely, and critically on the application of the knowledge obtained during the course to specific health policy issues
 
 
 

COURSE ORGANISATION

The course will be taught by a combination of weekly lectures and seminars and by a combination of in-class and online activities. It is essential that you read in preparation for all seminars as you will be expected to contribute to small group and wider class discussions and to make a presentation to your peers, stimulating discussion by highlighting key questions and concepts.

In teaching I use games, experiments and simulations to illustrate economic concepts and theories and various decision-making situations relevant to health policy. Such learning activities are traditionally used in economics and in my experience, these activities are especially suitable for teaching economics to non-economists because of their limited demands on prior knowledge of economics.

Lecture notes and slides, and essential readings will be available via QMPlus.

Class meetings: Biweekly Mondays 2-5pm (Week 1,3,5,8,10,12)

Online activities: Biweekly (Week 2,4,6,9,11)

Assessment  

The final grade of the course is based on two assessments:

1) Written assignment (50% of total grade). Each student will write a short paper individually. Assessment criteria for the paper will be provided at the start of the course. The paper will be limited to 1000 words.

2) Written exam (50% of total grade). At the end of the course, a written exam will be used to assess whether students have met the course’s learning aims. The written exam will comprise multiple-choice and open questions covering the main course readings, the additional readings for the seminars, and the lectures.

Main course readings

The following list of readings will be used as the main course literature. For each week, the week-by-week programme shows which readings will be discussed. Students are expected to read these readings in advance of the lectures. Furthermore, short additional readings are assigned for some of the seminar meetings. These are also shown in the week-by-week programme.

Morris, S., Devlin, N., and Parkin, D. (2007) Economic analysis in health care. Chichester:Wiley.

Office of Health Economics (2007) The economics of health care. https://www.ohe.org/sites/default/files/TheEconomicsofHeathCare2007.pdf

Glossaries

Glossaries of Economic Terms provides short cuts to definitions of basic economic concepts: http://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/teaching/glossaries.htm

OECD ‘Glossary of industrial organisation economics and competition law’ (http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/8/61/2376087.pdf)

Glossary of Frequently Encountered Terms in Health Economics provided by the National Library of Medicine, US is available at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/nichsr/edu/healthecon/glossary.html

Palmer, Byford, and Raftery (1999) ‘Types of economic evaluation’ BMJ 318:1349.

On-line databases

The University of York’s Health Economics Resource Centre provides and extensive list of policy analysis papers examining health policy from an economic perspective. Go to http://www.york.ac.uk/res/herc/research/hedg/publications.htm

WHO databases are also a valuable source of policy analysis:

Health systems: http://www.who.int/topics/health_systems/en/

Health economics: http://www.who.int/topics/health_economics/en/

Health policy: http://www.who.int/topics/health_policy/en/

Health funding: http://www.who.int/healthsystems/topics/financing/en/index.html

Health financing: http://www.who.int/health_financing/documents/list/en/index3.html

European Observatory: http://www.euro.who.int/observatory

Health accounts and country expenditure data: http://www.who.int/nha/en/

The World Bank’s web site includes a section on ‘Human Development and Public Services’; useful reports on Health and Nutrition can be found at: http://econ.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/EXTDEC/EXTRESEARCH/EXTPROGRAMS/EXTPUBSERV/0,,contentMDK:20292631~menuPK:545282~pagePK:64168182~piPK:64168060~theSitePK:477916,00.html

WEEK BY WEEK PROGRAMME

  1. Introduction:  Why do we study economics? 

Economics is the science concerned with choices about resource allocation under conditions of scarcity in order to derive the maximum possible benefit from available resources. Economic analysis has played an important role in answering policy questions about the relative roles of public and private sectors as well as questions such as the appropriate reward structures for medical professionals, the efficiency of insurance markets, how to contain costs, and the role of markets in resource allocation.

Topics

    • Scarcity and priority setting
    • Opportunity costs
    • Uses of economic analyses in health policy

 

 

Learning outcomes

  • To be able to explain the rationale for the use of economic analysis in health care
  • To be able to define and explore health care resource allocation mechanisms employed in different health systems

Essential reading

Morris et al. Chapter 1

OHE (2007) The economics of health care. Chapter 1

https://www.ohe.org/sites/default/files/TheEconomicsofHeathCare2007.pdf

  1. Micro-economic tools for health economics 

The neoclassical school of economics concentrates on market solutions to the problem of scarcity. Its basic axiom is that under certain specific conditions markets will lead to the most socially beneficial distribution of resources. This has important implications for public policy and the role of government. In this lecture students are introduced to the basic economic concepts and assumptions which underpin the argument for the market driven allocation of resources.

Topics

  • Utility, demand, supply
  • allocative and productive efficiency
  • competitive equilibrium
  • perfect market assumptions

Learning outcomes

 

  • To understand the key economic concepts underpinning the involvement of  markets in the provision of health care services

 

Essential reading

OHE (2007) The economics of health care. Chapter 2 https://www.ohe.org/sites/default/files/TheEconomicsofHeathCare2007.pdf

  1. Health and health care as goods 

The aim of this lecture is to investigate whether health services are economic goods traded in a perfect market. We will explore market failure arising from and policy responses to situations riddled with imperfect information. The focus will be on patient-physician relationship under out-off-pocket payments and when an insurance coverage is available.

Topics

  • Needs, wants and effective demand for health care
  • Elasticity of demand
  • Asymmetric information and imperfect agency: principal-agent problem, supplier-induced demand

Learning outcomes

    • To have a critical understanding of information asymmetry in the patient – health care provider relationship and its implications for demand for health care
    • To explain the concept of elasticity and its use in health policy making

 

 

Essential reading

OHE (2007) The economics of health care. https://www.ohe.org/sites/default/files/TheEconomicsofHeathCare2007.pdf

Morris et al. (Sections 2.5 & 2.6)

  1. The supply of health care 

This lecture and the accompanying seminar will focus on the public and market provision health care services and products. Economic analysis is used to determine how to achieve efficiency and equity through the institutions of government and the market. It makes an important contribution to debates about the role of the state and the extent and means of redistribution in society. We will examine core concepts and methods of economic analysis and how they have been used in health care sector reforms.

Topics

  • Monopoly and monopolistic competition
  • Government failure and market efficiencies
  • Imperfect competition
  • Privatization and the role of the government and markets in health care

Learning outcomes

  • To explain key economic concepts contributing to the debate on public-private roles in health care
  • To have a critical understanding of the limits of the economic perspective

Essential reading

Morris et al. Chapter 4 (selected sections)

WHO (1995) ‘Privatization in health’ Health Economics Briefing Note, WHO Task Force on Health Economics (http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/1995/WHO_TFHE_TBN_95.1.pdf)

  1. Externalities and public goods

The aim of this lecture is to explore another two types of market failure arising from information imperfections – externalities and public goods – and to look at policies that aim to reduce market inefficiencies in these two situations.

Topics

  • Externalities
  • Public goods and global public goods

Learning outcomes

  • To understand market failure and the role of government in the context of externalities and public goods
  • To be able to examine applications of the concept of externalities and public goods in policy making

Essential reading

Morris ch 5 (Market failure in health care; especially 5.3)

Smith et al (2003), Global public goods for health: health economic and public health perspectives, chapter 1 ‘Global public goods and health: concepts and issues’ by Woodward and Smith

  1. Health insurance and health care financing 

Demand for health care is unpredictable and consumers seek health insurance to spread costs of health care. Health insurance markets are riddled with imperfections that make the optimal organisation of insurance challenging. Concepts of risk pooling, adverse selection, and moral hazard will be introduced and we will discuss policies that aim to reduce inefficiencies in insurance markets as well as their impact on demand, health care utilization and cost containment.

Topics

  • Uncertainty and demand for health insurance
  • Risk pooling
  • Adverse selection
  • Moral hazard

Learning outcomes

  • To have a critical understanding of approaches to health care financing and their consequences for risk-pooling and cost-sharing
  • To understand economic concepts used to analyse insurance markets
  • To explain key policies addressing health insurance markets imperfections and their limitations

Essential reading

Morris et al. (2007) “Economic analysis in health care” (especially, 6.8 and 6.9-6.13)

  1. & 8. Measuring health need

Two lectures and two seminars will focus on health needs assessment (HNA). HNA is a systematic approach to describe health needs of a population, to identify inequalities in health and access to health care services, and to determine allocation of resources in health care. We will look into data required for HNA and approaches used at local and international level.

Topics

  • Epidemiological, routine, and cost-effectiveness data
  • DALYs, QALYs
  • Perspectives in needs assessment

Learning outcomes

  • To have a critical understanding of the role of epidemiology, economics and values in HNA
  • To understand approaches to HNA at local and international level
  • To have a critical understanding of data required, their availability and quality

Essential reading  

The BMJ series on Health Needs Assessment (1998)

Pollock AM & Price D (2013) ‘Loss of population data sources when health systems are not responsible for geographically defined populations: implications of the Health and Social Care Act of 2012 in England’. [http://www.allysonpollock.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/EBM_2013_Pollock_LossOfPopulationData.pdf]

  1. & 10. Economic evaluation 

Under the economic evaluation theme we will discuss the rationale for the use of economic evaluation in health care. To inform decisions about priorities and optimal allocation of resources in health care provision, economic analysis employs various evaluation methods. Key characteristics of these methods will be introduced. Examples of how economic evaluation is used in practice will be provided.

Topics

  • Cost-effectiveness, cost-utility
  • Measuring and valuing resources, outputs and outcomes
  • Economic evaluation in practice

Learning outcomes

  • To be able to explain the rationale for the use of economic evaluation in health care
  • To understand the key methods of economic evaluation
  • To have a critical understanding of the limitations of economic evaluation

Essential reading

Morris et al (2007) Chapter 9 & 12

Palmer, Byford, and Raftery (1999) ‘Types of economic evaluation’ BMJ 318:1349.

  1. Equity and efficiency 

No country in the world leaves the allocation of health care entirely to the invisible hand of the market. But what happens to economic efficiency when governments intervene to ensure that those on low incomes still get health care and to ensure that local health services stay open? The neoclassical account states that efficiency is reduced because any interference in the market reduces consumer welfare. Many economists realise that this is an unrealistic position because it essentially relies on the claim that government intervention is always and everywhere inefficient. These economists argue that alternative definitions of efficiency are required. In this lecture we will examine standard economic approaches to equity and efficiency.

Topics

  • The equity/efficiency trade off
  • Pareto optimality
  • Welfarist and extra welfarist foundations of economic evaluation

Learning outcomes

  • To understand the limits of economic analysis in health care policy making

Essential reading

Morris et al (2007) Section 12.3, 7.3


Rating: 15 credits

Prerequisites: None

Lectures: 1 hour per week semester A

Seminars: 2 hours per week semester A

Assessment:

Annotated Bibliography (30%) 
Review Essay (30%) Due: 
In-Class Quiz (15%) 
Poster and Presentation (25%)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Module Aims and Outline:
This module helps students to develop their written, critical reasoning, and teamwork skills. It develops general and academic communication skills for the specific context of global health. Students are introduced to a diversity of communication styles for different audiences, and learn how to examine and produce academic and professional texts from a variety of sources. Students will also explore how to critically assess and write persuasive and logical arguments for a variety of purpose.

Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the course students will be able to:

  • understand research and writing in global health
  • understand how to identify and translate what it means to critically engage with the literature in the field of global health
  • understand the contested nature of global health scholarship
  • understand basic study skills for reading and writing more effectively
  • access learning resources
  • work in a group and organize a group project
  • give presentations
  • have a more reflective attitude towards methods of learning
  • read and critique multidisciplinary texts related to global health
  • understand and use conceptual and analytical frameworks for analysing and understanding global health issues
  • evaluate the work of global health scholars

Reading:
D. R.  Forsyth (2006) Group Dynamics (4th edn, Belmont CA.: Thomson Wadsworth Publishing) Ch. 1

Paulus (2000). ‘Group, Teams, and Creativity: The Creative Potential of Idea-generating Groups’. Applied Psychology, 49(2), 237–262.

Massey University (1999-2010), How to identify academic resources. Available: http://owll.massey.ac.nz/academic-writing/identifying-academic-sources.php

S. Cottrell (2003) The study skills handbook, 2nd edn, Palgrave, Basingstoke.A Lock and VK Nguyen 

Level: First year undergraduate (level 4)

Semester: 1

Course credits: 15 ECTS

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Module aims and outline

This module is a compulsory module for the BSc Global Health year 1.

The introduction sets the scene of global health and wellbeing and inequities in global health.  We will explain the multiple interacting factors that determine or influence health at either the individual or the population level.  There will be a strong focus on social determinants of health and the complex ways in which they impact upon health and health inequities. Later lectures and seminar discussions will use particular topics to illustrate the theories, concepts and potential solutions to these issues.  The module aims to explore, with examples, health issues at local, national and international levels. 

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course students will:

  • Have a global perspective with regards to global health and social and health inequities and inequalities
  • Outline the key determinants of health
  • Have considered the importance of treating individuals versus populations
  • Understand the different mechanisms for social factors to influence health outcomes
  • Have an understanding of social inequalities and their impact on health
  • Have a basic understanding of the complex interactions between variables impacting upon health
  • Have a basic understanding of the nature of short and long causal pathways
  • Understand inequity in health across population groups
  • Have some understanding of policies required to reduce health inequities through social change and to be able to apply this in debates on how to address social inequities in health
  • Be able to evaluate and synthesise the public health literature relating to the social determinants of health

Main course readings

We list below, the main core readings and resources for this module. Additional readings that students will be expected to read  in advance of the lectures and seminar will be added to the week-by-week programme as appropriate. 

  • CSDH (2008). Closing the gap in a generation: health equity through action on the social determinants of health. Final report of the Commission on Social Determinants of Health.  Geneva, World Health Organisation.
  • Michael Marmot and Richard Wilkinson (2006). Social Determinants of Health. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett (2010). The Spirit Level: Why Equality Is Better for Everyone. London: Penguin Books.
  • The Black Report: Inequalities in Health. Report of a research working group, DHSS 1980
  • The Health Divide: Inequalities in Health in the 1980s. Margaret Whitehead.
  • The Acheson report: Understanding Health Inequalities, (2000), Open University Press
  • The Black report and beyond. What are the issues? Soc. Sci. Med. Vol. 44, No. 6, pp. 723-745, 1997
  • Social determinants of health website of the World Health Organisation. http://www.who.int/social_determinants/en/

COURSE ORGANISATION

Taught sessions

The class will meet every week for two sessions in one day. For example, a one-hour lecture from 9.30am to 10.30am might be followed by a seminar on from 11:00am to 1:00pm. The module lead, or occasionally guest lecturers, will present the lecture. These will be interactive sessions. We would like you to engage actively, ask questions and respond to questions. The seminars give us an opportunity to explore a topic in more depth.  They may occur the same day as the lecture on that topic or later in the programme. The seminars may include: short presentations, debates or discussion of materials brought to the seminar. Please do the required readings and preparation ahead of the seminar or lecture so as to maximise your enjoyment and learning and so the class can get the most of these sessions. The instructions will be put on QMplus ahead of teaching.

WEEK BY WEEK PROGRAMME

This is an example for prospective students-course structure subject to change

Part 1 – weeks 1-4

In the first four weeks we set the scene of global health and wellbeing, inequities in global health and concepts and models that link these with social determinants.  We will explain the multiple interacting factors that determine or influence health at either the individual or the population level.  We will introduce social determinants of health and the complex ways in which they impact upon health and health inequities. We will discuss the nature of evidence and measurement.   

WEEK 1: Introduction to global health and health inequities

Objectives (L1, S1 and S2):

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught sessions for this topic, you will:

  • Have an overview of this course content and structure
  • Have an understanding of the historic epidemiological and demographic trends in global health
  • Be aware of international differences in health and wellbeing
  • Appreciate the scale of inequities between and within countries
  • Be able to describe definitions of health and the differences between health inequalities and health inequities

In these sessions we will introduce global health.  We look at historic trends in global health.  We consider what is health and what are health inequities and demonstrate stark health inequities between and within countries. Is this an issue of social justice? What are some of the key ways in which these should be addressed?  

Seminar 1 (S1): Introduction to global health and Health inequities I

In this first seminar we will seminar will ask the questions:

  • What is health?
  • What do we understand by health inequities?

You will also have the opportunity to ask any questions about the course content and structure.

Preparation for the seminar: 

  • Read the essential reading for week 1.
  • Bring an example from the news of a health issue of your interest from any country. Be prepared to describe the article in 2-3 minutes to the rest of the group including:  a) Why does this interest you b) What is the main health issue described? c) What groups in society are more likely to exprience this health issue?

Compulsory Reading:

  • Course outline on QMplus
  • Commission for the Social Determinants of Health, 2008. Chapters 1, 2 and 3.
  • Others to be advised

WEEK 2: What causes health and ill health? (determinants)

Objectives (L2, S3):

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught sessions for this topic, you will:

  • Be able to describe broad determinants of health
  • Have a understanding of the historic and global context of ill health
  • Consider individual vs population approaches

In these sessions we introduce models, such as Dahlgren and Whitehead, that outline the key determinants of health. We will introduce what is included in the social determinants and the “causes of the causes”.  We will discuss some of the historic context that contributes to the different patterns of disease globally.

Seminar 2: Introduction to global health and Health inequities II

The seminar will be used to further our understanding of this topic. It may take the form of a debate about international inequities in health.  Further detail will be given ahead of the seminar, please prepare as requested. Have fun exploring: http://www.gapminder.org/ 

Compulsory Reading:

  • The Acheson report: Part 1
  • “The Black report and Beyond” by Macintyre
  • Others to be advised

Week 3: Explaining social determinants and links to health and health inequities (pathways)

Objectives (L3, S5):

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught sessions for this topic, you will:

  • Understand the different mechanisms or pathways for social factors to influence health outcomes
  • Begin to understand the complexity of interactions between factors
  • Understand definitions of social status
  • Understand the social gradient in health

In these sessions we deepen our understanding of what is meant by social determinants. We then explore the mechanisms, theories and pathways for social factors to influence health.  These include, for example, the impact of material deprivation and psychosocial factors.  We will begin to see that there is complex interaction between the different factors

Seminar 3: What causes health and ill health? (determinants)

The seminar coincides with World Mental Health Day . Read the compulsory readings. Bring your stories and experience re mental health and wellbeing and notice campaigns.  We will discuss some of the determinants that are linked to mental health and wellbeing. 

Compulsory Readings

  • To be advised

Week 4: Measurement, information and evidence

Objectives (L4, S4):

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught sessions for this topic, you will:

  • Understand the approaches to evidence and measurement in describing health inequity and determinants of health
  • Appreciate the importance but limitations of measurement and evidence

Measurement and evidence are important to further understanding of this field and inform policy.  However there are challenges.  In these sessions we will discuss aproaches to measuring determinants and their impact on health and health equity. 

Seminar 4: Mini project with Epidemiolgy & Stats (Measurement)

Social determinants/Epi&Stats Joint Mini-Project: This uses the concept of this week (Measurement, information and evidence) together with those of Lecture and Practical 2 (Ecological studies) of Epi&Stats.  The task will be given today and the time of the seminar today will be allocated to getting started with the task. The students will then be expected to work in pairs to the task over the next 10 days and give a 5 minutes slide presentation during the Epi&Stats Practical 5 (SDH/Epi&Stats Mini Project presentation) on Tuesday October 28th.  

Compulsory Reading:

  • To be advised

 

Part 2: weeks 5 to 11

Studies of selected social determinants of health

These later weeks we will explore particular topics in more depth.  This aims to further illustrate the concepts of the first four weeks and give an exposure to some key topics in global health. In addition to the specific objectives for each week, these sessions aim to further your understanding of:

  • the different mechanisms for social factors to influence health outcomes and the complexities of these interactions
  • potential policies required to reduce health inequities through social change and enable you to apply this in debates on how to address social inequities in health
  • measurement and evidence and how to evaluate and synthesise the public health literature relating to the social determinants of health
  • a global perspective with regards to global health and social and health inequities

Week 5: Work, unemployment and income

Objectives (L5 and S6):

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught sessions for this topic you will be able to:

  • Give examples of the impact of employment, unemployment and income on health equity
  • Understand the impact of absolute and relative income on health
  • Understand the link with other social determinants eg education

These sessions explore the fundamental issues of employment (including positive and negative attributes) and unemployment .  The impacts of relative and absolute income and social status as determinants of health are also further discussed.  Teachings from earlier in the course on the measurement of socio-economic status and the social gradient in health wil be further developed.  We will critique key literature and consider policy solutions.

Seminar 5: Explaining social determinants and links to health and health inequities (pathways)

The seminar will be used to further our understanding of pathways including their policy implications.  Further detail will be given ahead of the seminar, please prepare as requested.

Compulsory Reading:

To be advised.

Week 6: Health inequities between population groups.

Objectives (L6, S8):

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught sessions for this topic, you will:

  • Understand inequity in health across population groups

These sessions highlight the inequities in health outcomes between different populations.  We explore examples and multi-factorial explanations for these differences. Gender and ethinicty are key and other examples are: socio-economic status (covered throughout the course), disability and sexual orientation.

Seminar 6: Work, Unemployment and income

The seminar will be used to further our understanding of “work, unemployment and income” The seminar will be based upon a critique of the Spirit Level and its implications for policy. Key chapters of the Spirit Level to be read ahead of the seminar.  Further detail will be given ahead of the seminar, please prepare as requested.

Compulsory Reading:

To be advised.

Week 7: Reading week

There are no taught sessions for for this course during the reading week. The reading week is intended as an opportunity for you as students to complete outstanding coursework, to revise the readings, and to work on your essay. 

Week 8: Social capital

Objectives (L8 and S8):

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught sessions for this topic you will be able to: 

  • Describe and explain the main mechanisms linking social relationships and social capital to health and health inequity
  • Relate social relationships and social capital to other social determinants of health.
  • Critically evaluate policy to promote social capital.

In this lecture, we examine to what extent, why, and how a range of different social relationships (i.e., family, friends, and social clubs and organisations) influences health and health inequities. In addition to the structure of social relationships, we discuss how the quality or content of social relationships affects health inequalities. Also, we scrutinize the debate over the beneficial impact of ‘social capital’, which is a high density and high quality of social relationships in communities. Does social capital indeed lead to better health and smaller health inequity, and if so, how can governments promote social capital? Finally, we examine the link between social relationships, social capital, and other social determinants of health (e.g., education). 

Seminar 8: Social Capital

The seminar will be used to further our understanding of this topic (Social Capital) and the previous lecture (Health Inequities Between Population Groups).  Further detail will be given ahead of the seminar, please prepare as requested.

Compulsory Reading:

  • To be advised

Week 9:  Early life and childhood development

Objective (L9 and S9):

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught sessions for this topic you will be able to:

  • Understand the importance of early life and childhood development as a determinant of health
  • Appreciate the complexity of interacting factors
  • Give examples of short and long causal pathways influencing health inequities

In these sessions we will study how during early life (at conception, and/or during fetal life, infancy and early childhood), the environment induces changes in development that have long term impact on later health and disease risk.  We will use the seminar to study broader social determinants of health relating to early life.  An international programme, Families and Schools Together (FAST), will demonstrate how some of these issues may be tackled to improve health and social outcomes. We hope to be joined by Professor Seif Shaheen and Professor Lynn McDonald. 

Seminar 9: 

The seminar will be based upon a discussion of key readings and study of the FAST programme.  Details to follow.

Compulsory Reading:

To be advised

Additional reading:

Explore the website of the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHAD) at http://www.mrc-leu.soton.ac.uk/dohad/index.asp 

Explore the website of Family and Schools Together (FAST) at http://www.familiesandschools.org/programs

Week 10: Physical environment and housing

Objectives:

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught sessions for this topic, you will:

  • Be able to explain key factors in the physical environment that impact upon health and health inequalities

 Seminar: Physical environment and housing

The seminar will be used to further our understanding of this topic based on the lecture and key readings. In addition we hope to have a guest speaker Dr Jin Lim who has led work across London on “Healthy High Streets”.  Further detail will be given ahead of the seminar, please prepare as requested.

Compulsory Reading:

To be advised.

Week 11: What next?

Objectives (L11 and S11):

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught sessions for this topic you will be able to:

  • Meet all the objectives of this course
  • Understand some of the global context that facilitates or works against addressing social determinants and reducing inequities in health
  • Give examples of approaches to addressing social determinants and reducing inequities in health at international, national or local levels

This session will re-enforce some of the key messages from this course. We will see the complex and cross cutting nature of the social determinants of health and some of the challenges of this field. We will explore some additional approaches to addressing social determinants and reducing health inequities and discuss some of the context in which these would be operating.

Seminar 11: Course overview and question and answer

Structured and facilitated question and answer session for the whole class on course content.

Introduce to action based learning and action groups eg MEDACT!

Compulsory reading:

  • To be advised

 

Part 3: Week 12

Week 12: Exam

 December

There is no lecture or seminar for this course in week 12. Instead, the students will take a written exam.  Further details (see above) and to advised. 

Rating: 15 credits

Prerequisites: None

Lectures: 1 hour per week semester B

Seminars: 2 hours per week semester B

Assessment: 2000 word essay (80%) and group presentation(20%)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Module Aims and Outline:

This module provides an introduction to the social scientific disciplines of anthropology, sociology, and science and technology studies (STS), and demonstrates how they have been applied to the study of health and medicine. The concept of culture and its role in patterning experiences of sickness and the knowledge practices of medicine and will be introduced. The associations and variances between different medical systems and how they conceptualise the body, sickness, health and health care in a globalised world will be explored. The relationship between health, medicine, governance and citizenship will also be introduced and discussed. The overall aim of the module is to help students accrue a set of theoretical and conceptual tools that can aid in developing a critical understanding of medicine, health, and sickness across different contemporary societies.

Key Learning Outcomes:
By the end of the module students will be able to:

  • Recall and explain key anthropological, sociological and STS theories and methodological approaches relevant to the study of health, medicine and global health scholarship.
  • Discuss and analyse the philosophical and conceptual issues surrounding notions of disease, sickness, and health.
  • Appreciate how knowledge, practices and experiences of health and medicine are influenced by various cultural, political, economic and technological factors.
  • Explore and appraise the inter-relationship between ‘society’ and ‘governance’ with regard to definitions of health and institutions of health and medicine.
  • Understand and evaluate the claim that contemporary health issues are ‘biosocial’ in nature.
  • Consider how anthropological, sociological and STS scholarship can contribute to medical practice across contemporary societies.
  • Enhance oral and written communication through seminar presentations and essay writing.

Key module texts:

J Biehl and A Petryna (2013) When People Come First: Critical Studies in Global Health. Woodstock: Princeton

P Farmer, A Kleinman, J Kim & M Basilico (Eds) (2013) Reimagining Global Health: an introduction, University of California Press

A Lock and VK Nguyen (2010) An Anthropology of Biomedicine. Chichester, West Sussex; Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell,

D Lupton (1994) Medicine as Culture: Illness, Disease and the Body in Western Societies. London: Sage.

Pool R & Geissler W (2005) Medical Anthropology (Understanding Public Health), London: Open University Press

Level: First year undergraduate (level 4)

Semester: B

Course credits: 15 ECTS

Course coordinator:

Dr. Tim Huijts
Lecturer in Global Public Health
Centre for Primary Care and Public Health
Blizard Institute
Queen Mary University of London
Yvonne Carter Building, Room 1.09
58 Turner Street, E1 2AB London
Phone: (020) 7882 2497
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course content

Most of today’s major health problems affect people worldwide, and transcend national boundaries. Moreover, both the causes and potential solutions to these major threats to global health are often located at a global level, and in many cases related to political issues involving international institutions. To understand how politics impacts global health, a special focus on the international level is therefore justified. This course provides an introduction into the role of international politics in global health. We describe the role of the different actors in international politics, with a special focus on international institutions and their role in the governance of global health. We discuss the structures and relationships between these institutions, and how these structures and relationships influence global health. Additionally, we use insights from theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action to explain why international politics is so important for global health. As such, this course also serves as a general introduction to theories from political science, sociology, and economics on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.

Additionally, we apply these theoretical insights to five key themes that connect international politics and global health: foreign aid, alcohol and tobacco consumption, financialisation and privatisation, trade and production, and infectious diseases. This approach will reveal how basic principles on international institutions, international relations, social cooperation, and collective action can be applied to a broad range of domains in the field of global health. For each of the key themes, we focus on a number of selected characteristic cases from across the globe.

Learning aims

By the end of the course students will be able to:

  • Identify the key actors linking international politics to global health and their role in global health governance.
  • Describe and explain the relationships and structures between the key actors in the international politics of global health.
  • Reproduce and explain key theories relevant for global health on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.
  • Apply key theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action to recent, specific cases in global health.
  • Critically evaluate arguments from theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.
  • Write clearly, concisely, and critically on the application of the knowledge obtained during the course to recent, specific cases in global health.

Relation to other BSc Global Health courses

  • This course offers an introduction to specialized courses on the role of international politics in global health (e.g., the third year course on Public health, international law and governance). Basic knowledge and skills obtained in the current course will be further developed in these specialized courses.
  • The course builds on knowledge and skills from the Semester A course on Basic issues in politics and global health. Theories and key concepts from the Semester A course (e.g., ideology) will be applied to the international politics of global health, institutional actors at the international level will be introduced in more detail, and more weight will be given to the importance of interests and incentives for global health. Additionally, general political theory will be complemented by theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action, to demonstrate why the relationship between politics and health should be examined at a global level. Often, these theories have strong connections to the theories introduced in the Semester A course on Basic issues in politics and global health.
  • The course offers a first case-based introduction to main subjects from later courses in the BSc Global Health programme (e.g., trade and globalization).
  • The course distinguishes itself from other courses in the BSc Global Health programme by also serving as a general introduction to international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.

Main course readings

The following list of readings will be used as the main course literature. For each week, the week-by-week programme shows which readings will be discussed. Students are expected to read these readings in advance of the lectures. Furthermore, short additional readings are assigned for some of the seminar meetings. These are also shown in the week-by-week programme.

-J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens. The Globalization of World Politics, 5th Edition (Oxford University Press, 2011).

-C. McInnes and K. Lee. Global Health & International Relations (Polity Press, 2012).

-D.P. Fidler (2007). ‘Architecture amidst Anarchy: Global Health’s Quest for Governance’, Global Health Governance, 1, 1-17.

-J.R. Youde. Global Health Governance (Polity Press, 2012).

-D. Stuckler and S. Basu. The Body Economic (Allen Lane, 2013).

COURSE ORGANISATION

Class meetings

Every week, there are two class meetings: one one-hour lecture and one two-hour seminar. All lectures are on Mondays from 10:00am to 11:00am, and all seminars are on Mondays from 11:00am to 13:00pm. During the lectures, the course material will be presented and discussed by dr. Tim Huijts. There will also be room for questions during the lectures, and students will be asked to engage actively with the lectures by answering questions from the lecturer. The seminars will focus on answering, discussing, and debating questions and assignments that are based on the lectures, the main course readings, and additional literature. Students will be actively involved in the seminars by chairing and participating in debates, giving short presentations, and discussing the seminar questions and assignments in the group.

Assessment

The final grade of the course is based on two assessments:

1) Written exam (50% of total grade). In the final week of the course, a written exam will be used to assess whether students have met the course’s learning aims. The written exam will take the form of a number of open questions covering the main course readings, the additional readings for the seminars, and the lectures.  

2) Short essay (50% of total grade). Each student will write a short essay individually. The deadline for handing in the essay is March 13, 2015, at 17:00pm. Assessment criteria for the essay will be provided at the start of the course. The essay will be limited to 1500 words.

WEEK BY WEEK PROGRAMME

Week 1: Introduction: international politics and global health

Theme:

The course starts with a section on theories and actors in international politics. In the first week, we give a general introduction to the issue of international politics and global health. We briefly revisit the main conclusions from the Semester A course on Basic issues on politics and global health, to show how the current course builds on and adds to that course. With several examples, we will show why many global health issues transcend the level of nations, and can therefore not be addressed sufficiently by national governments alone. We will look ahead to the theories on international relations, social cooperation and collective action that will be discussed in weeks 3 and 4, and argue why their understanding is important to examine the relationship between international politics and global health. As such, this week’s lecture and seminar will show the importance of international politics for global health, and explain the relevance of the approach taken in this course.

Seminar questions:

-Questions for discussion in Baylis et al. (p. 30, p. 48, p. 64, and p. 79).

-Think of examples of health issues that cannot be tackled by national governments, and that require solutions at an international level. Why can national governments not sufficiently address these problems? Explain the barriers for successful solutions for governments. Can you think of international organizations that might be able to offer solutions for these particular problems?

Readings:

-J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens. The Globalization of World Politics, 5th Edition (Oxford University Press, 2011), Introduction and Chapters 1 to 4.

-C. McInnes and K. Lee. Global Health & International Relations (Polity Press, 2012), Introduction and Chapters 1 and 2.

Additional readings:

None

Learning objectives:

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught components for this week, we hope you will be able to:

  • Identify the key actors linking international politics to global health and their role in global health governance.
  • Describe and explain the relationships and structures between the key actors in the international politics of global health.

Week 2: The institutional actors: an overview

Theme:

In addition to national governments, international institutions take in a central position in the international politics of global health. Most prominently, the World Health Organization is explicitly focused on studying and solving global health issues, and liaises with national governments to tackle health problems in their countries. However, several other international organizations also have an important role in the international politics of global health. This week, we will give an overview of the most important institutional actors in the international politics of global health. We will discuss the most important aims, the structure, and the history of a range of institutions such as the European Union, the United Nations, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund. Also, we will discuss at a basic level how these institutions might influence health problems, and how they interact with national governments and other actors to have an impact on global health. This serves as an introduction to the second part of the module, where we will see that institutional actors do not always succeed in improving global health.

Seminar questions:

-Questions for discussion in Baylis et al. (p. 324 and p. 341).

-Students will be assigned to groups, and each group will work from the perspective of one international institution (e.g., the World Health Organization and the European Union). Each group will answer the following questions for their institution: (a) what can this institution do to improve global health?; (b) how would the institution try to achieve this?; and (c) does the institution need to cooperate with other international institutions and national governments to achieve this? If so, how?   

Readings:

-J.R. Youde. Global Health Governance (Polity Press, 2012), Introduction and Chapters 1 to 6.

 

-J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens. The Globalization of World Politics, 5th Edition (Oxford University Press, 2011), Chapters 19 and 20.

Additional readings:

None

Learning objectives:

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught components for this week, we hope you will be able to:

  • Identify the key actors linking international politics to global health and their role in global health governance.
  • Describe and explain the relationships and structures between the key actors in the international politics of global health.

Week 3: Theories on international relations

Theme:

As has become clear in the first two weeks of the course, global health issues cannot be tackled by national governments alone, and international institutions have a crucial role in addressing global health at an international level, in cooperation with national governments and other international institutions. But why do states in some cases cooperate, and in other cases rival each other? How does conflict between states arise? What is the role of globalization in spurring cooperation and/or conflict between states? And what is the role of international institutions in coordinating cooperation and conflict between states? These are elementary questions from the subject of international relations, and different theories on international relations have different answers to these questions. In this week’s lecture and seminar, we discuss the main six main theories on international relations: realism, liberalism, Marxism, social constructivism, post-structuralism, and post-colonialism. We will see how these theories follow from approaches to general political theory that were discussed in the course on Basic issues in politics and global health in Semester A. Finally, we will discuss how these theories lead to different predictions about the role of national governments and international institutions in dealing with contemporary global problems. Together with the lecture and seminar in week 4, this week’s lecture and seminar offer a theoretical background to the international politics of global health that will be applied to five key themes in global health in the second part of the course.

Seminar questions:

-Questions for discussion in Baylis et al. (p. 98, p. 112, p. 128, p. 145, p. 164, p. 179, p. 194, and p. 210).

-How would the six theories on international relations explain the problem of climate change? And what do the six theories imply for possible solutions for this global problem?

Readings:

-J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens. The Globalization of World Politics, 5th Edition (Oxford University Press, 2011), Chapters 5 to 12.

Additional readings:

None

Learning objectives:

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught components for this week, we hope you will be able to:

  • Reproduce and explain key theories relevant for global health on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.
  • Critically evaluate arguments from theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.

Week 4: Social cooperation and collective action in international governance

Theme:

In week 3, we discussed theories on international relations to explain why states are sometimes cooperative and sometimes in conflict. However, most of these theories cannot fully explain why international institutions are not able to solve conflicts between states. Also, it is not completely clear from these theories why international institutions sometimes have difficulty cooperating with each other, and why they do not always achieve coordination between states so that national governments cooperate with each other and with the international institutions. In this week’s lecture and seminar, we will use theories on social cooperation and collective action from economics and sociology to explain why international institutions do not necessarily make cooperation between states easier, and why solutions to global problems remain difficult in a globalized world. Basic problems in cooperation will be illustrated with examples from game theory, such as the prisoners’ dilemma and the ultimatum game. Looking at examples from the literature on collective action, we identify conditions under which collective action to solve global problems is difficult, and conditions under which collective action is feasible. These theories explain why even if all actors involved believe that they make the best decision, they may still lead to a situation that is suboptimal for all actors. In the second part of the course, these insights will be used to explain key issues in global health.

Seminar questions:

-Questions for discussion in Baylis et al. (p. 244 and p. 308).

-Make sure to have a good understanding of the prisoners’ dilemma (see the readings) before the seminar. In the seminar we will do several exercises with the prisoners’ dilemma and similar experiments to understand why people and institutions do not always cooperate, even if it is in the best interest of all parties involved.

Readings:

-J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens. The Globalization of World Politics, 5th Edition (Oxford University Press, 2011), Chapters 14 and 18.

Additional readings:

None

Learning objectives:

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught components for this week, we hope you will be able to:

  • Reproduce and explain key theories relevant for global health on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.
  • Critically evaluate arguments from theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.

Week 5: Foreign aid revisited: local, national or international politics?

Theme:

Foreign aid is provided and implemented at different levels (by local and national governments in donor countries as well as receiving countries, and by international institutions). As was concluded in the module on Basic issues on politics and global health in Semester A, foreign aid therefore needs to be examined at an international level, rather than simply looking at the role of national government in the countries involved in foreign aid schemes. In this week’s lecture and seminar, we use the six main theories on international relations to further explain why the claim that foreign aid is helpful for people in the receiving countries has often been contested. Also, these theories further help us to explain why donor countries decide to invest in foreign aid in the first place. Finally, we look at the role of the international institutions in providing and implementing foreign aid, and examine the influence of NGOs and private companies and interest groups in foreign aid initiatives.

Seminar questions:

-Questions for discussion in Baylis et al. (p. 474).

-Who should be responsible for implementing foreign aid programmes in the receiving countries? National governments, local governments, NGOs, private companies, international institutions, or the national governments of the donor countries? For each group of actors, consider arguments for and against making them responsible for implementing foreign aid programmes.  

Readings:

-J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens. The Globalization of World Politics, 5th Edition (Oxford University Press, 2011), Chapter 28.

-C. McInnes and K. Lee. Global Health & International Relations (Polity Press, 2012), Chapter 3.

Additional readings:

None

Learning objectives:

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught components for this week, we hope you will be able to:

  • Apply key theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action to recent, specific cases in foreign aid.
  • Critically evaluate arguments from theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.

Week 6: Alcohol and tobacco consumption

Theme:

Alcohol and tobacco consumption are two of the most important indirect causes of death worldwide. Whereas alcohol and tobacco use on a large scale used to be limited to Europe and North America, the consumption of alcohol and tobacco has seen a dramatic increase in other continents over the last few decades. This week, we will explain this dramatic increase in alcohol and tobacco consumption, and we discuss how health damaging behavior of this kind can be tackled. Importantly, we note that alcohol and tobacco use are truly global problems. Firstly, multinational tobacco and alcohol companies have played a large role in the increase of consumption in Africa and Asia, especially in countries with limited regulation. Especially with regulations having become more strict in Europe, and with the rise of a new middle class in Asia and Africa, tobacco and alcohol companies have changed their focus to these continents. Also, we discuss the role of lobby groups for the tobacco and alcohol industry in international institutions. Secondly, successful implementation of several policies to reduce alcohol and tobacco consumption (especially taxes) is difficult when neighbouring countries fail to adopt similar policies. We discuss how these problems can be circumvented, and how international institutions might help or harm the design and implementation of policies to reduce alcohol and tobacco use.

Seminar questions:

-Why are many governments reluctant to increase taxes on tobacco and alcohol? Explain, using theories on social cooperation and collective action, and think about how international institutions could make it easier for governments to increase taxes on tobacco on alcohol.

Readings:

None

Additional readings:

-D.H. Jernigan et al. (2000). ‘Towards a global alcohol policy: alcohol, public health and the role of the WHO’. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 78, 491-499.

-P. Jha and R. Peto (2014). ‘Global effects of smoking, of quitting, and of taxing tobacco’. New England Journal of Medicine, 370, 60-68.

Learning objectives:

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught components for this week, we hope you will be able to:

  • Apply key theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action to recent, specific cases on alcohol and tobacco consumption.
  • Critically evaluate arguments from theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.

Week 7: Reading week

Theme:

There are no lecture and seminar for this course during the reading week. However, the reading week is not a vacation week, and students are expected to complete outstanding coursework, to revise the readings, and to work on their essay.

Week 8: Financialisation and privatisation

Theme:

Evidence is mounting that the recent economic recession has had a major impact on global health, e.g. by increasing unemployment and by limiting the availability and accessibility of healthcare. However, several studies also suggest that the economic recession was mostly harmful in countries where governments decide to implement austerity policies. This was mostly done under pressure of international institutions such as the International Monetary Fund. In this week’s lecture and seminar, we discuss the impact of the economic recession and austerity on global health. Also, we relate the current economic recession to earlier economic shocks across the globe, such as the Great Depression in the United States and the end of communism in the former Soviet Union. We discuss research on privatization during economic shocks, that shows that privatization has often made matters worse. To understand why national governments have nonetheless repeatedly decided to privatize public services, we have a closer look at the role of international actors such as the International Monetary Fund and the European Union. Also, we place current financial policy in the context of the broader trend of financialisation that started in the early 1980s. As such, this week will also reveal how political ideologies have not just influenced national governments, but also had a profound impact on international institutions.

Seminar questions:

-Questions for discussion in Baylis et al. (p. 260).

-Austerity has a negative effect on people’s health, but still governments continue to implement austerity policies. How would the six theories on international relations explain this?

-Do you think austerity policies increase or decrease social inequalities in health? Explain.

Readings:

-D. Stuckler and S. Basu. The Body Economic (Allen Lane, 2013).

-J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens. The Globalization of World Politics, 5th Edition (Oxford University Press, 2011), Chapter 15.

Additional readings:

None

Learning objectives:

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught components for this week, we hope you will be able to:

  • Apply key theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action to recent, specific cases on financialisation and privatisation.
  • Critically evaluate arguments from theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.

Week 9: Trade and production

Theme:

This week’s lecture will be a guest lecture by dr. David McCoy. He is the chair of Medact (www.medact.org), and an expert in the international politics of global health. He has published several articles and commentary pieces about the impact of trade on global health. In this guest lecture, he will discuss how trade influences health, and how new and proposed trade agreements may form a serious threat to global health. Further information about this guest lecture will be given closer to the date.

Seminar questions:

-Questions for discussion in Baylis et al. (p. 456).

-Other seminar questions will be announced closer to the seminar, in collaboration with this week’s guest lecturer.

Readings:

-J.R. Youde. Global Health Governance (Polity Press, 2012), Chapter 9.

-J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens. The Globalization of World Politics, 5th Edition (Oxford University Press, 2011), Chapter 27.

-C. McInnes and K. Lee. Global Health & International Relations (Polity Press, 2012), Chapters 4 and 5.

Additional readings:

-D. Legge, D. Sanders and D. McCoy (2009). ‘Trade and health: the need for a political economic analysis’. Lancet, 373, 527-529.

-M. McKee and P. Belcher (2014). ‘The European Commission and pharmaceutical policy’. British Medical Journal, doi: 10.1136/bmj.g5671.

Learning objectives:

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught components for this week, we hope you will be able to:

  • Apply key theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action to recent, specific cases on trade and production.
  • Critically evaluate arguments from theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.

Week 10: Infectious diseases: prevention and control

Theme:

In large parts of the world, infectious diseases are still responsible for a considerable share of mortality and morbidity, even though most of these diseases are preventable. The recent example of the Ebola epidemic will be used to illustrate how and why it is often difficult for international institutions to contribute effectively to quick solutions for global health problems. Also, we discuss why international institutions and other national governments only provided limited and late help to the healthcare systems of the countries that were most affected. Theories on social cooperation and collective action will be used to show why international institutions can often not fully address global health problems. Also, we will look at examples of outbreaks of other infectious diseases in the past (e.g., cholera) to identify under what conditions successful intervention to stop infectious diseases are most feasible. Finally, we address the issue of why there is sometimes little investment in research and policy to prevent infectious diseases, while prevention would be much less costly for societies and individuals involved than disease control.

Seminar questions:

-To what extent was the fact that the recent Ebola epidemic was only addressed late by international institutions due to problems of collective action? Use theories on collective action and social cooperation to answer these questions.

-How could international institutions and national governments be encouraged to invest more money and time in research and policy for the prevention of infectious diseases?

Readings:

-J.R. Youde. Global Health Governance (Polity Press, 2012), Chapters 7 and 8.

-C. McInnes and K. Lee. Global Health & International Relations (Polity Press, 2012), Chapter 6.

Additional readings:

-G. T. Keusch et al. (2010). ‘The Global Health System: Linking Knowledge with Action – Learning from Malaria’, PLoS Medicine, 7, 1-6.

Learning objectives:

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught components for this week, we hope you will be able to:

  • Apply key theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action to recent, specific cases on infectious diseases.
  • Critically evaluate arguments from theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.

Week 11: Summary and conclusion

Theme:

In the third and final section of the course, we formulate conclusions. First, a summary of the course will be given. We look back at the five key themes, and see to what extent overarching conclusions can be drawn from these five themes. In doing so, we also examine what the examples from the five key themes have taught us about the role of the international institutions in the international politics of global health, about theories on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action, and about the impact of structures and relationships between actors on global health. We discuss an overview of the ways through which international relations, social cooperation, and collective action have an impact on the international politics of global health, and therefore also on global health as such. Additionally, we examine potential solutions for today’s major global health threats, and consider whether these solutions can be found at the level of local, national, or international politics. Finally, we discuss some ethical issues in the international politics of global health, for politicians, policy makers, and health professionals, but also for scientists.

Seminar questions:

Students are asked to prepare their own questions about the readings and the lectures. The answers to their questions will be discussed during the seminar. Also, students will get the opportunity to answer and discuss example exam questions. As such, the final seminar is intended to revise the course material, solve outstanding problems and clarifications, and to prepare for the written exam. Additionally, students are asked to consider the following questions:

-Questions for discussion in Baylis et al. (p. 524).

-If we want to improve global health, should we aim at changing international politics or national politics in countries worldwide? Use Frenk’s article and the knowledge about the international politics of global health that you obtained in this course to answer this question.

-What changes do you propose to international institutions and global health governance that would contribute to a better response to the major threats to global health? Give three concrete recommendations.

Readings:

-J. Baylis, S. Smith and P. Owens. The Globalization of World Politics, 5th Edition (Oxford University Press, 2011), Chapter 31.

-D.P. Fidler (2007). ‘Architecture amidst Anarchy: Global Health’s Quest for Governance’, Global Health Governance, 1, 1-17.


Additional readings:

-J. Frenk (2010). ‘The Global Health System: Strengthening National Health Systems as the Next Step for Global Progress’, PLoS Medicine, 7, 1-3.

-S. Moon et al. (2010). ‘The Global Health System: Lessons for a Stronger Institutional Framework’, PLoS Medicine, 7, 1-5.

Learning objectives:

When you have completed the reading and participated in the taught components for this week, we hope you will be able to:

  • Reproduce and explain key theories relevant for global health on international relations, social cooperation, and collective action.
  • Write clearly, concisely, and critically on the application of the knowledge obtained during the course to recent, specific cases in global health.

Week 12: Exam

Theme:

There is no lecture and seminar for this course in Week 12. Instead, the students will take a written exam.